2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150171
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Music and Chronic Pain: A Clinical Trial
Abstract:
Music and Chronic Pain: A Clinical Trial
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Siedlecki, Sandra Lee, RN, MSN, CNS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Akron
Title:Instructor
Chronic non-malignant pain (CNMP) affects millions of individuals and results in powerlessness, depression, and disability. Pharmacological interventions have unpleasant side effects and provide only partial relief. Previous research suggests that the addition of non-pharmacological interventions, such as music, may be more effective than traditional interventions alone for the treatment of CNMP and its associated depression and disability. The purpose of this study is to examine and compare the effects of two music interventions on power, pain, depression, and disability in individuals with CNMP. Ninety-six adults (ages 21-65) who have experienced back, neck, and or joint pain for more than six months will be randomly assigned to one of three groups. The patterning music group will use self-selected music and music-listening techniques based on self-evaluation of comfort and mood, the standard music group will use relaxing instrumental music provided by the researcher, and the control group will receive no music intervention. It is posited that the perceived pain, depression, and pain related functional disability would decrease in both music groups, that it will decrease more in the PM group, and that this effect will be mediated by power. The McGill Pain Questionnaire SF, The Pain Disability Index, the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, and the Power as Knowing Participation in Change Tool will be used to examine the effect of the music interventions. One-hour music interventions will be self-administered once a day for seven consecutive days and data is collected at baseline, day 7, and day 14. A priori orthogonal contrasts with analysis of co-valance (ANCOVA) will be used to test the first two hypotheses and partial correlation coefficients will be calculated to determine if power is a mediating variable. Data collection is ongoing and should be complete in March of 2003 with analysis completed by June 2003
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMusic and Chronic Pain: A Clinical Trialen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150171-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Music and Chronic Pain: A Clinical Trial</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Siedlecki, Sandra Lee, RN, MSN, CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Akron</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Instructor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">siedlec@uakron.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Chronic non-malignant pain (CNMP) affects millions of individuals and results in powerlessness, depression, and disability. Pharmacological interventions have unpleasant side effects and provide only partial relief. Previous research suggests that the addition of non-pharmacological interventions, such as music, may be more effective than traditional interventions alone for the treatment of CNMP and its associated depression and disability. The purpose of this study is to examine and compare the effects of two music interventions on power, pain, depression, and disability in individuals with CNMP. Ninety-six adults (ages 21-65) who have experienced back, neck, and or joint pain for more than six months will be randomly assigned to one of three groups. The patterning music group will use self-selected music and music-listening techniques based on self-evaluation of comfort and mood, the standard music group will use relaxing instrumental music provided by the researcher, and the control group will receive no music intervention. It is posited that the perceived pain, depression, and pain related functional disability would decrease in both music groups, that it will decrease more in the PM group, and that this effect will be mediated by power. The McGill Pain Questionnaire SF, The Pain Disability Index, the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, and the Power as Knowing Participation in Change Tool will be used to examine the effect of the music interventions. One-hour music interventions will be self-administered once a day for seven consecutive days and data is collected at baseline, day 7, and day 14. A priori orthogonal contrasts with analysis of co-valance (ANCOVA) will be used to test the first two hypotheses and partial correlation coefficients will be calculated to determine if power is a mediating variable. Data collection is ongoing and should be complete in March of 2003 with analysis completed by June 2003</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:18:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:18:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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