Factors Related to Consequences and Cure/Control of Type 2 Diabetes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150182
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Related to Consequences and Cure/Control of Type 2 Diabetes
Abstract:
Factors Related to Consequences and Cure/Control of Type 2 Diabetes
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Stich, Thelma, PhD, APRN, BC, CDE
P.I. Institution Name:Seton Hall University
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: Diabetes is a chronic illness requiring a daily regimen to maintain health and prevent future adverse sequelae. However persons with diabetes, like other Americans, are not immune to the effects of interpersonal conflict that is so prevelant in contemporary society. One literature views the effects of conflict as negative, resulting in behaviors that negatively impact illness. However, another literature presents an opposing view, describing the positive influence of interpersonal conflict on personal growth and change adaptation. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between social support, interpersonal conflict, and perceptions of the consequences and control of diabetes among persons with type 2 diabetes. Design: This study used a correlational design. Sample: The sample consisted of 174 men and women with type 2 diabetes. Variables: The independent variables were social support and interpersonal conflict. The dependent variables were cure/control and consequences, aspects of illness representation. Methods: Participants recruited from http://www.mydiabetes.com, a diabetes website, answered items on a questionnaire measuring social support and interpersonal conflict and a second questionnaire measuring cure/control and consequences. Findings: The findings revealed statistically significant negative correlations between interpersonal conflict and consequences (r = -.42, p <.001) and statistically significant positive correlations between social support and both cure/control (r = .18, p <.01) and consequence (r= .33, p<.001). Conclusions: Based on the support from this study, it may be concluded that social support and interpersonal conflict influence an individual’s perception of the consequences associated with their diabetes and their ability to control their diabetes. Implications: Interventions that enhance conflict resolution skills should be included as an critical component of existing support groups for persons with diabetes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Related to Consequences and Cure/Control of Type 2 Diabetesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150182-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors Related to Consequences and Cure/Control of Type 2 Diabetes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stich, Thelma, PhD, APRN, BC, CDE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Seton Hall University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">stichthe@shu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Diabetes is a chronic illness requiring a daily regimen to maintain health and prevent future adverse sequelae. However persons with diabetes, like other Americans, are not immune to the effects of interpersonal conflict that is so prevelant in contemporary society. One literature views the effects of conflict as negative, resulting in behaviors that negatively impact illness. However, another literature presents an opposing view, describing the positive influence of interpersonal conflict on personal growth and change adaptation. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between social support, interpersonal conflict, and perceptions of the consequences and control of diabetes among persons with type 2 diabetes. Design: This study used a correlational design. Sample: The sample consisted of 174 men and women with type 2 diabetes. Variables: The independent variables were social support and interpersonal conflict. The dependent variables were cure/control and consequences, aspects of illness representation. Methods: Participants recruited from http://www.mydiabetes.com, a diabetes website, answered items on a questionnaire measuring social support and interpersonal conflict and a second questionnaire measuring cure/control and consequences. Findings: The findings revealed statistically significant negative correlations between interpersonal conflict and consequences (r = -.42, p &lt;.001) and statistically significant positive correlations between social support and both cure/control (r = .18, p &lt;.01) and consequence (r= .33, p&lt;.001). Conclusions: Based on the support from this study, it may be concluded that social support and interpersonal conflict influence an individual&rsquo;s perception of the consequences associated with their diabetes and their ability to control their diabetes. Implications: Interventions that enhance conflict resolution skills should be included as an critical component of existing support groups for persons with diabetes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:18:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:18:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.