Community-based baccalaureate education: Empowering students and communities

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150190
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Community-based baccalaureate education: Empowering students and communities
Abstract:
Community-based baccalaureate education: Empowering students and communities
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Polatty, Nancy
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nevada
The Orvis School of Nursing offers an upper-division, four semester major. After three faculty members attended the AACN Community-Based Baccalaureate Education conference, faculty decided to implement the community-based concept into the senior year health promotion semester. Faculty believed that the health promotion clinical experience would be the best place to begin integration of community-based education into our curriculum. This presentation will describe how faculty implemented community-based baccalaureate education. With three relevant courses in the third semester, health promotion theory, health promotion laboratory, and health promotion practice, faculty made sure that the content was congruent across the courses. The students learned community-based concepts in the theory course, practiced them in the lab course, and implemented them in the practice course. Each group of eight students was assigned to a different community of need. These communities ranged from downtown with many homeless and transient casino workers, to an ethnically mixed neighborhood consisting of long-term residents and new immigrants, to a low-income semi-rural area moving towards middle to upper income, to a rural low-income area with few services. The students conducted community-based assessments and worked with the communities to identify their primary needs and achievable projects that would meet some of these needs. The student groups then designed and executed one or two projects to meet what had been identified as high-priority needs. After completing these projects, the students and communities evaluated the identification of needs, choices of projects, and design and execution of the projects. After one semester, faculty, students, and communities identified what had worked, what had not worked, and what could be done better. Lessons learned have been integrated into the design of the current community-based health promotion semester. As a result of this experience, the communities were empowered to work with the students in identifying and meeting some of their health needs. The students learned how to collaborate effectively with communities and community leaders in urban, semi-urban, and rural communities. Attendees of this presentation will learn how community-based nursing education differs from community health nursing education, how to implement community-based education, potential pitfalls to avoid, and will be given resources to use in designing a community-based experience. A quick search of CINHAL revealed 19 articles in the year 2000 on community-based education. Interest in this topic is high among nursing educators. In addition to this scholarly interest, community-based nursing education also exposes students to nursing scholarship in action.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCommunity-based baccalaureate education: Empowering students and communitiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150190-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Community-based baccalaureate education: Empowering students and communities</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Polatty, Nancy</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nevada</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">npolatty@unr.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The Orvis School of Nursing offers an upper-division, four semester major. After three faculty members attended the AACN Community-Based Baccalaureate Education conference, faculty decided to implement the community-based concept into the senior year health promotion semester. Faculty believed that the health promotion clinical experience would be the best place to begin integration of community-based education into our curriculum. This presentation will describe how faculty implemented community-based baccalaureate education. With three relevant courses in the third semester, health promotion theory, health promotion laboratory, and health promotion practice, faculty made sure that the content was congruent across the courses. The students learned community-based concepts in the theory course, practiced them in the lab course, and implemented them in the practice course. Each group of eight students was assigned to a different community of need. These communities ranged from downtown with many homeless and transient casino workers, to an ethnically mixed neighborhood consisting of long-term residents and new immigrants, to a low-income semi-rural area moving towards middle to upper income, to a rural low-income area with few services. The students conducted community-based assessments and worked with the communities to identify their primary needs and achievable projects that would meet some of these needs. The student groups then designed and executed one or two projects to meet what had been identified as high-priority needs. After completing these projects, the students and communities evaluated the identification of needs, choices of projects, and design and execution of the projects. After one semester, faculty, students, and communities identified what had worked, what had not worked, and what could be done better. Lessons learned have been integrated into the design of the current community-based health promotion semester. As a result of this experience, the communities were empowered to work with the students in identifying and meeting some of their health needs. The students learned how to collaborate effectively with communities and community leaders in urban, semi-urban, and rural communities. Attendees of this presentation will learn how community-based nursing education differs from community health nursing education, how to implement community-based education, potential pitfalls to avoid, and will be given resources to use in designing a community-based experience. A quick search of CINHAL revealed 19 articles in the year 2000 on community-based education. Interest in this topic is high among nursing educators. In addition to this scholarly interest, community-based nursing education also exposes students to nursing scholarship in action.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:18:34Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:18:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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