Embracing Information Technology While Assuring Quality for Faculty and Students in a Department of Baccalaureate Nursing

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150191
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Embracing Information Technology While Assuring Quality for Faculty and Students in a Department of Baccalaureate Nursing
Abstract:
Embracing Information Technology While Assuring Quality for Faculty and Students in a Department of Baccalaureate Nursing
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Gritzmacher, Deborah
P.I. Institution Name:Clayton College & State University
In 1996 Clayton College & State University became one of two in the state to implement a program committed to the use of Information Technology. Each student and faculty member was provided with a notebook computer equipped with a common platform of software allowing communication with all others in the system, e-mail, and Internet access. Certainly some faculty and students were more skilled with computers than others so classes were provided to ensure a common starting point. The intense threat of IT was palpable on campus. Resistance was unavoidable in both students and faculty. This resistance among faculty was respected but overcome with time and commitment from administration. Those who used and appreciated technology were energized by the affirmation from administration and their peers in the academy. The staff development opportunities, technology support systems, and faculty mentoring activities further enhanced the opportunity to succeed. Students required less time to appreciate and use the technology. Perhaps this is a function of youth or just exposure to computer technology in other facets of their life. Resistance from this group came in the form of complaints about the technology fee assessed for use of the computer and server access. The fee is now covered for many students with financial aid and some scholarships. In the school year 1997/98, our university began enhancing course offerings with different components of computer technology. The Health Sciences faculty embraced IT by posting elective and selected core courses in the partially on-line format and progressed to fully on-line, in some cases, by the end of spring semester. There were opportunities to design and develop for those brave self-starters but there was equal opportunity for the computer phobic to progress to an acceptable level in course design. The key to success for this faculty as a whole and individually was staff development classes for all university faculty, technological support (The HUB), process skills with design component and troubleshooting (FIDL), and collegial collaboration/sharing of creative ideas. As our technology skills improved we progressed and began weaving links from nursing specific courses back to core curriculum thereby reinforcing underlying principals of the arts and science. The students and faculty understand and better appreciate the interrelatedness of their program of study. The lived experience of embracing IT was painful but exciting. There were days of frustration followed by mere moments basking in the glory. We accomplished our original goals and we are progressing with our efforts to keep up with the next technological advances. This is an ongoing experience. After three years of using IT in a university system, faculty came together as a representative group to establish a staff development program to assist in designing pedagogically sound on-line courses. The American Association of Higher Education’s (AAHE) “Seven Principals for Good Practice” forms the structure and focus for the program of study. Early in 1998 faculty began questioning how Information Technology affected expected student outcomes. We wanted to know about the quality of on-line compared to on-campus offerings. We wondered if on-line offerings engaged the learning styles of all students. In 28 Atlanta, Georgia hospitals computers are used for various order entry systems and record keeping. It is underutilized in the hospital setting for staff and client education. This study showed increasing numbers of executive managers devoted exclusively to IT. Only small not-for-profit systems are not using IT for staff/patient education. The primary reason for not using IT is cost of implementation, and 100% of the systems not using IT felt it is just a matter of time before they will implement computer enhanced education. Additionally 82% of hospitals use computer based programs and believe computer facilitated learning enhances patient education about disease/illness and treatment modalities, health education and prevention, staff education and certification, and orientation and annual review skills updates. Graduates of our university program are prepared to identify, implement, and problem solve in all of these circumstances.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmbracing Information Technology While Assuring Quality for Faculty and Students in a Department of Baccalaureate Nursingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150191-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Embracing Information Technology While Assuring Quality for Faculty and Students in a Department of Baccalaureate Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gritzmacher, Deborah</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Clayton College &amp; State University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">deborahgritzmacher@mail.clayto</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In 1996 Clayton College &amp; State University became one of two in the state to implement a program committed to the use of Information Technology. Each student and faculty member was provided with a notebook computer equipped with a common platform of software allowing communication with all others in the system, e-mail, and Internet access. Certainly some faculty and students were more skilled with computers than others so classes were provided to ensure a common starting point. The intense threat of IT was palpable on campus. Resistance was unavoidable in both students and faculty. This resistance among faculty was respected but overcome with time and commitment from administration. Those who used and appreciated technology were energized by the affirmation from administration and their peers in the academy. The staff development opportunities, technology support systems, and faculty mentoring activities further enhanced the opportunity to succeed. Students required less time to appreciate and use the technology. Perhaps this is a function of youth or just exposure to computer technology in other facets of their life. Resistance from this group came in the form of complaints about the technology fee assessed for use of the computer and server access. The fee is now covered for many students with financial aid and some scholarships. In the school year 1997/98, our university began enhancing course offerings with different components of computer technology. The Health Sciences faculty embraced IT by posting elective and selected core courses in the partially on-line format and progressed to fully on-line, in some cases, by the end of spring semester. There were opportunities to design and develop for those brave self-starters but there was equal opportunity for the computer phobic to progress to an acceptable level in course design. The key to success for this faculty as a whole and individually was staff development classes for all university faculty, technological support (The HUB), process skills with design component and troubleshooting (FIDL), and collegial collaboration/sharing of creative ideas. As our technology skills improved we progressed and began weaving links from nursing specific courses back to core curriculum thereby reinforcing underlying principals of the arts and science. The students and faculty understand and better appreciate the interrelatedness of their program of study. The lived experience of embracing IT was painful but exciting. There were days of frustration followed by mere moments basking in the glory. We accomplished our original goals and we are progressing with our efforts to keep up with the next technological advances. This is an ongoing experience. After three years of using IT in a university system, faculty came together as a representative group to establish a staff development program to assist in designing pedagogically sound on-line courses. The American Association of Higher Education&rsquo;s (AAHE) &ldquo;Seven Principals for Good Practice&rdquo; forms the structure and focus for the program of study. Early in 1998 faculty began questioning how Information Technology affected expected student outcomes. We wanted to know about the quality of on-line compared to on-campus offerings. We wondered if on-line offerings engaged the learning styles of all students. In 28 Atlanta, Georgia hospitals computers are used for various order entry systems and record keeping. It is underutilized in the hospital setting for staff and client education. This study showed increasing numbers of executive managers devoted exclusively to IT. Only small not-for-profit systems are not using IT for staff/patient education. The primary reason for not using IT is cost of implementation, and 100% of the systems not using IT felt it is just a matter of time before they will implement computer enhanced education. Additionally 82% of hospitals use computer based programs and believe computer facilitated learning enhances patient education about disease/illness and treatment modalities, health education and prevention, staff education and certification, and orientation and annual review skills updates. Graduates of our university program are prepared to identify, implement, and problem solve in all of these circumstances.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:18:35Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:18:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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