Comparing Japanese Female Nurses and Non-Nurses’ Knowledge of CHD Risk Factor

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150196
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparing Japanese Female Nurses and Non-Nurses’ Knowledge of CHD Risk Factor
Abstract:
Comparing Japanese Female Nurses and Non-Nurses’ Knowledge of CHD Risk Factor
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Easterling, Phyllis, EdD
P.I. Institution Name:Samuel Merritt College
Title:Department Chair, Nursing
Objective: Heart disease is a major health problem for Japanese women. The purpose of this study was to investigate the level of knowledge about coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors between female Japanese nurses and non-nurses. Design: This correlational study compared knowledge of coronary heart disease risk factors between Japanese health professional women (nurses) and non-health professional women. Sample: Data were gathered on a convenience sample of 136 female nurses, including 53 ICU/CCU nurses and 83 non-ICU/CCU nurses and 45 non-nurse females between the ages of 30-55. None of the nurses graduated from a four-year college or graduate school. Of the non-nurses 32.6% graduated from a four-year college and 4.3% from a graduate school. The non-nurses were solicited from choral, church, college support services staff, and school-parent groups. Setting: The Japanese nurses were attending continuing education meetings in Shizuoka Prefecture (State) while the non-nurse females lived in Hamamatsu City in Shizuoka Prefecture. Shizuoka Prefecture is a large agricultural/industrial area on the east coast of Japan, south of Tokyo. Names of Variables: The two variables of the study were (1) health professional women (nurses) and non-health professional women and (2) knowledge of CHD risk factors including smoking, hypertension, obesity, cholesterol, fats, diet, exercise, stress, diabetes, estrogen, and heredity. Measures/Instruments: Knowledge of CHD risk factors was measured by a 12-item written test. Each question had a value of one point, with a range of possible scores from 0 to 12. The test was composed of 7 questions with content validity and 5 questions with content and construct validity, as well as internal consistency. Findings: The CHD knowledge level scores were low for all three groups, with means under 6 out of a possible total score of 12. The scores between the groups were not significantly different. Questions on estrogen deficiency were correctly answered by more than 50% of respondents. Fifty percent or less of the women had knowledge about smoking, healthy low-fat diets, hypertension, obesity, exercise, and diabetes as they relate to heart disease. Over 95% of the nurses and non-nurses knew that stress over time is believed to contribute to CHD. There was no significant difference in knowledge between nurses who provide nursing care for cardiac patients versus nurses who do not provide such care. Conclusions: The assumption was that nurses, particularly ICU/CCU nurses, by virtue of their education, would be more knowledgeable about heart disease than non-nurses. The low scores and lack of significant differences between ICU/CCU nurses and non-ICU/CCU nurses and between nurses and non-nurses on the CHD knowledge test raise questions about the effectiveness of nurses who provide nursing care for cardiac patients and teach about CHD risk factors. Implications: While heart disease is a major health problem for Japanese women, Japanese literature reveals little research on Japanese women’s knowledge of risk factors for heart disease. The results of this study suggests the need to educate all women, but particularly nurses who care for patients with cardiac disease about CHD risk.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparing Japanese Female Nurses and Non-Nurses’ Knowledge of CHD Risk Factoren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150196-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparing Japanese Female Nurses and Non-Nurses&rsquo; Knowledge of CHD Risk Factor</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Easterling, Phyllis, EdD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Samuel Merritt College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Department Chair, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">peasterling@samuelmerritt.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Heart disease is a major health problem for Japanese women. The purpose of this study was to investigate the level of knowledge about coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors between female Japanese nurses and non-nurses. Design: This correlational study compared knowledge of coronary heart disease risk factors between Japanese health professional women (nurses) and non-health professional women. Sample: Data were gathered on a convenience sample of 136 female nurses, including 53 ICU/CCU nurses and 83 non-ICU/CCU nurses and 45 non-nurse females between the ages of 30-55. None of the nurses graduated from a four-year college or graduate school. Of the non-nurses 32.6% graduated from a four-year college and 4.3% from a graduate school. The non-nurses were solicited from choral, church, college support services staff, and school-parent groups. Setting: The Japanese nurses were attending continuing education meetings in Shizuoka Prefecture (State) while the non-nurse females lived in Hamamatsu City in Shizuoka Prefecture. Shizuoka Prefecture is a large agricultural/industrial area on the east coast of Japan, south of Tokyo. Names of Variables: The two variables of the study were (1) health professional women (nurses) and non-health professional women and (2) knowledge of CHD risk factors including smoking, hypertension, obesity, cholesterol, fats, diet, exercise, stress, diabetes, estrogen, and heredity. Measures/Instruments: Knowledge of CHD risk factors was measured by a 12-item written test. Each question had a value of one point, with a range of possible scores from 0 to 12. The test was composed of 7 questions with content validity and 5 questions with content and construct validity, as well as internal consistency. Findings: The CHD knowledge level scores were low for all three groups, with means under 6 out of a possible total score of 12. The scores between the groups were not significantly different. Questions on estrogen deficiency were correctly answered by more than 50% of respondents. Fifty percent or less of the women had knowledge about smoking, healthy low-fat diets, hypertension, obesity, exercise, and diabetes as they relate to heart disease. Over 95% of the nurses and non-nurses knew that stress over time is believed to contribute to CHD. There was no significant difference in knowledge between nurses who provide nursing care for cardiac patients versus nurses who do not provide such care. Conclusions: The assumption was that nurses, particularly ICU/CCU nurses, by virtue of their education, would be more knowledgeable about heart disease than non-nurses. The low scores and lack of significant differences between ICU/CCU nurses and non-ICU/CCU nurses and between nurses and non-nurses on the CHD knowledge test raise questions about the effectiveness of nurses who provide nursing care for cardiac patients and teach about CHD risk factors. Implications: While heart disease is a major health problem for Japanese women, Japanese literature reveals little research on Japanese women&rsquo;s knowledge of risk factors for heart disease. The results of this study suggests the need to educate all women, but particularly nurses who care for patients with cardiac disease about CHD risk.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:18:41Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:18:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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