Perceptions of Health and Promotion of Health Behaviors in Urban Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150198
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceptions of Health and Promotion of Health Behaviors in Urban Women
Abstract:
Perceptions of Health and Promotion of Health Behaviors in Urban Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Kotecki, Catherine
P.I. Institution Name:University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey
Objective: The purpose of this study is to describe and explain urban women's perceptions of health and health related behaviors. Design: The study utilized Pender's Health Promotion Model as a conceptual framework (Pender; 1990, 1996). The descriptive design utilized a triangulated qualitative and quantitative methodology. Sample/setting: A convenience sample of 85 women was drawn from a population of 296 employees and parents at two Head Start organizations operating in primarily urban community in the northeast. Seventy-one women met the study criteria of working or living in an urban area. Measures/Instruments: Objective measures included the Health Promotion Lifestyle Profile II (HPLP II) (Walker, Sechrist % Pender, 1997) and the Community Health Services Survey (CHSS). The HPLP II, a four point Likert scale with six sub scales, has an overall Cronbach's alpha of .95 and has been used with people of diverse races (Duffy, Ahijevych, & Bernhard, 1994). The CHSS contained demographic data and questions about health needs and was developed by the faculty at the School of Nursing. Subjective data collection was accomplished through the use of a researcher developed guided interview, which contained ten questions. Women employees and parents were approached at an education day for Head Start and had the research study explained to them, consent was obtained and those willing to participate filled out the study materials. Six women associated with one Head Start center were approached and consented to be interviewed. Interviews were held in a private room at the center, utilized open-ended questions, and lasted approximately one hour. All interviews were audio taped and were transcribed by a research assistant. Findings: Data analysis was completed using SPSS base 9.0 and NUD*ist software for text data. The sample ranged in age from 18 to 63 years with a mean of 34 years (SD 11) the subjects were well educated; 18% (n=13) were high school graduates, 34% (n=24) had attended college and 28% (n=20) held a college degree. Ninety two percent (n=65) of subjects were employed in the urban environment and 62% (n=44) lived there. Subjects were primarily African American (68%, N=48) or Hispanic (21%, N=15). On the four point HPLP II Likert scale where the subject could select a response of 1-never, 2-sometimes, 3-often, and 4-routinely, the mean score for the subjects was 2.47 (SD 0.32) indicating that they sometimes too often engaged in health promoting practices. The subscale with the highest mean was the spiritual growth sub scale, (mean 2.92, SD .47) indicating that subjects selected spiritual practices to promote health more regularly than other health promoting practices. In descending order the scales ranked as follows: interpersonal relations (mean 2.81, SD 0.41), health responsibility (mean 2.48 SD 0.44), stress management (mean 2.31 SD .49), nutrition (mean 2.27 SD 0.44), and physical activity (mean 2.00 SD.05). The Cronbach alpha for the total scale was 0.85. Interview data were analyzed using the constant comparative method of data analysis (Glaser, 1978). Five themes emerged from the data: (a) What's affecting my health: health concerns, (b) Not taking care of my health, (c) Using cultural health practices, (d) Depending on God, (e) Moving toward better health. All these themes included elements of the HPLP II, as women shared their health concerns, problems and behaviors. Conclusions: The spiritual aspect of health emerged as a strong component of urban women's lives as evidenced by HPLP II scores and interviews. Implications: The spiritual aspect of health is worthy of more complete investigation by clinicians and researchers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceptions of Health and Promotion of Health Behaviors in Urban Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150198-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perceptions of Health and Promotion of Health Behaviors in Urban Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kotecki, Catherine</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Medicine &amp; Dentistry of New Jersey</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">koteckcn@umdnj.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this study is to describe and explain urban women's perceptions of health and health related behaviors. Design: The study utilized Pender's Health Promotion Model as a conceptual framework (Pender; 1990, 1996). The descriptive design utilized a triangulated qualitative and quantitative methodology. Sample/setting: A convenience sample of 85 women was drawn from a population of 296 employees and parents at two Head Start organizations operating in primarily urban community in the northeast. Seventy-one women met the study criteria of working or living in an urban area. Measures/Instruments: Objective measures included the Health Promotion Lifestyle Profile II (HPLP II) (Walker, Sechrist % Pender, 1997) and the Community Health Services Survey (CHSS). The HPLP II, a four point Likert scale with six sub scales, has an overall Cronbach's alpha of .95 and has been used with people of diverse races (Duffy, Ahijevych, &amp; Bernhard, 1994). The CHSS contained demographic data and questions about health needs and was developed by the faculty at the School of Nursing. Subjective data collection was accomplished through the use of a researcher developed guided interview, which contained ten questions. Women employees and parents were approached at an education day for Head Start and had the research study explained to them, consent was obtained and those willing to participate filled out the study materials. Six women associated with one Head Start center were approached and consented to be interviewed. Interviews were held in a private room at the center, utilized open-ended questions, and lasted approximately one hour. All interviews were audio taped and were transcribed by a research assistant. Findings: Data analysis was completed using SPSS base 9.0 and NUD*ist software for text data. The sample ranged in age from 18 to 63 years with a mean of 34 years (SD 11) the subjects were well educated; 18% (n=13) were high school graduates, 34% (n=24) had attended college and 28% (n=20) held a college degree. Ninety two percent (n=65) of subjects were employed in the urban environment and 62% (n=44) lived there. Subjects were primarily African American (68%, N=48) or Hispanic (21%, N=15). On the four point HPLP II Likert scale where the subject could select a response of 1-never, 2-sometimes, 3-often, and 4-routinely, the mean score for the subjects was 2.47 (SD 0.32) indicating that they sometimes too often engaged in health promoting practices. The subscale with the highest mean was the spiritual growth sub scale, (mean 2.92, SD .47) indicating that subjects selected spiritual practices to promote health more regularly than other health promoting practices. In descending order the scales ranked as follows: interpersonal relations (mean 2.81, SD 0.41), health responsibility (mean 2.48 SD 0.44), stress management (mean 2.31 SD .49), nutrition (mean 2.27 SD 0.44), and physical activity (mean 2.00 SD.05). The Cronbach alpha for the total scale was 0.85. Interview data were analyzed using the constant comparative method of data analysis (Glaser, 1978). Five themes emerged from the data: (a) What's affecting my health: health concerns, (b) Not taking care of my health, (c) Using cultural health practices, (d) Depending on God, (e) Moving toward better health. All these themes included elements of the HPLP II, as women shared their health concerns, problems and behaviors. Conclusions: The spiritual aspect of health emerged as a strong component of urban women's lives as evidenced by HPLP II scores and interviews. Implications: The spiritual aspect of health is worthy of more complete investigation by clinicians and researchers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:18:44Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:18:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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