The Attitudes and Behaviors of Migrant Farmworkers Toward Diabetes Self-Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150199
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Attitudes and Behaviors of Migrant Farmworkers Toward Diabetes Self-Care
Abstract:
The Attitudes and Behaviors of Migrant Farmworkers Toward Diabetes Self-Care
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Heuer, Loretta
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Dakota
Objective: Poor attitudes and behavioral choices along with an inadequate knowledge level of diabetes increase the individual’s risks for serious diabetic complications, including death. Currently, there is limited information in the literature regarding the attitudes and behaviors of the Hispanic migrant farmworkers with diabetes. The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes and behaviors of Hispanic migrant farmworkers regarding their diabetic care. Design: Descriptive, quantitative design. Sample and setting: The study was conducted in eleven Migrant Health seasonal nurse-managed clinics in the upper Midwest. Data collection took place during a four-month period. A convenience sample of 127 migrant farmworkers with diabetes completed a questionnaire while waiting to be seen by a nurse. Names of Variables or Concept: In addition to attitudes and behaviors, factors measured included gender, age, education, income, number in household, marital status, body mass index, type of diabetes, and age of diagnosis. Measures/Instruments: When migrant farmworkers or family members with diabetes arrived at the Migrant Health nurse-managed clinics, bilingual health outreach workers asked them to take part in the study. Participants who consented were asked questions in either English or Spanish from the Diabetes Attitudes and Behaviors Questionnaire. Upon completion of the questionnaire, it was put in the medical chart so the nurse could fill in the physical assessment section (type of diabetes, blood sugar, body mass index, blood pressure, and hemoglobin A1c). Findings: There were 65 (51%) females and 63 (49%) males in the sampling with mean age of 65 (range 23-69). Eleven (9%) were Type I and 115 (91%) were type II (n=126). Females were more likely to believe they should check their feet and cholesterol, while males thought they should have their blood pressure checked. Migrant farmworkers with higher incomes had the most positive behaviors in checking blood sugar, blood pressure, retinopathy (eye disease), gylcosylated hemoglobin (HbAlc), and cholesterol while obtaining flu shots. Also, they were more likely to believe in the importance of drinking water or diet soda and obtaining annual retinopathy exams. Participants with high body mass indexes (BMI) had mixed attitudes and behaviors about eating a proper diet and the importance of exercise, though they did not get the amount of exercise needed. The older participants in the sample showed good behaviors regarding annual retinopathy exams, urine tests, flu shots, and exercise, as well as more likely to believe in the importance of regular meals. However, they were not likely to have a balanced diet. Married migrant farmworkers were more likely to have positive attitudes toward proper drink and diet, as well as eating a good diet and having normal blood sugars. Respondents who were type I had better behaviors regarding meals, diet, flu shots and cholesterol checks. Conclusions: The study of attitude and behavioral change is crucial to the care of migrant farmworkers with diabetes. Healthcare providers are well aware of the fact that clients often do not change their attitudes or behaviors because they are expected to make multiple changes all at once. Frequently, little thought is given to the barriers migrant clients endure when making lifestyle changes. In practice, health care providers need to acknowledge and work around barriers encountered by these clients in order to set realistic goals for them and improve health care to the migrant population. Implications: Although this paper presents board generalizations of a heterogeneous cultural group, considering the attitudes and behaviors of migrant farmworkers with diabetes assists health care providers in tailoring primary care and educational interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Attitudes and Behaviors of Migrant Farmworkers Toward Diabetes Self-Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150199-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Attitudes and Behaviors of Migrant Farmworkers Toward Diabetes Self-Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Heuer, Loretta</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Dakota</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">loretta.heuer@worldnet.att.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Poor attitudes and behavioral choices along with an inadequate knowledge level of diabetes increase the individual&rsquo;s risks for serious diabetic complications, including death. Currently, there is limited information in the literature regarding the attitudes and behaviors of the Hispanic migrant farmworkers with diabetes. The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes and behaviors of Hispanic migrant farmworkers regarding their diabetic care. Design: Descriptive, quantitative design. Sample and setting: The study was conducted in eleven Migrant Health seasonal nurse-managed clinics in the upper Midwest. Data collection took place during a four-month period. A convenience sample of 127 migrant farmworkers with diabetes completed a questionnaire while waiting to be seen by a nurse. Names of Variables or Concept: In addition to attitudes and behaviors, factors measured included gender, age, education, income, number in household, marital status, body mass index, type of diabetes, and age of diagnosis. Measures/Instruments: When migrant farmworkers or family members with diabetes arrived at the Migrant Health nurse-managed clinics, bilingual health outreach workers asked them to take part in the study. Participants who consented were asked questions in either English or Spanish from the Diabetes Attitudes and Behaviors Questionnaire. Upon completion of the questionnaire, it was put in the medical chart so the nurse could fill in the physical assessment section (type of diabetes, blood sugar, body mass index, blood pressure, and hemoglobin A1c). Findings: There were 65 (51%) females and 63 (49%) males in the sampling with mean age of 65 (range 23-69). Eleven (9%) were Type I and 115 (91%) were type II (n=126). Females were more likely to believe they should check their feet and cholesterol, while males thought they should have their blood pressure checked. Migrant farmworkers with higher incomes had the most positive behaviors in checking blood sugar, blood pressure, retinopathy (eye disease), gylcosylated hemoglobin (HbAlc), and cholesterol while obtaining flu shots. Also, they were more likely to believe in the importance of drinking water or diet soda and obtaining annual retinopathy exams. Participants with high body mass indexes (BMI) had mixed attitudes and behaviors about eating a proper diet and the importance of exercise, though they did not get the amount of exercise needed. The older participants in the sample showed good behaviors regarding annual retinopathy exams, urine tests, flu shots, and exercise, as well as more likely to believe in the importance of regular meals. However, they were not likely to have a balanced diet. Married migrant farmworkers were more likely to have positive attitudes toward proper drink and diet, as well as eating a good diet and having normal blood sugars. Respondents who were type I had better behaviors regarding meals, diet, flu shots and cholesterol checks. Conclusions: The study of attitude and behavioral change is crucial to the care of migrant farmworkers with diabetes. Healthcare providers are well aware of the fact that clients often do not change their attitudes or behaviors because they are expected to make multiple changes all at once. Frequently, little thought is given to the barriers migrant clients endure when making lifestyle changes. In practice, health care providers need to acknowledge and work around barriers encountered by these clients in order to set realistic goals for them and improve health care to the migrant population. Implications: Although this paper presents board generalizations of a heterogeneous cultural group, considering the attitudes and behaviors of migrant farmworkers with diabetes assists health care providers in tailoring primary care and educational interventions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:18:46Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:18:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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