2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150200
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Maternal coping with preterm labor: An intervention
Abstract:
Maternal coping with preterm labor: An intervention
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Feinstein, Nancy
P.I. Institution Name:University of Rochester
Title:Senior Research Associate
Objective: Women with preterm labor (PTL) experience multiple stressors that result in anxiety, mood changes and depression during pregnancy. This has implications for the pregnancy experience and may impact on emotions and functioning after pregnancy. Despite the fact that 20% of women experience PTL with its associated negative impact, there is a paucity of theoretically-driven intervention studies designed to promote maternal coping during this type of high-risk pregnancy. The major purpose of this study was to test an intervention designed to improve maternal coping outcomes. The specific aims were to: (a) evaluate the effects of an experimental program (MOST: Monitoring of Self Through Transition) on emotional and functional outcomes of women with PTL; and (b) evaluate the coping process through a theoretical framework comprised of self-regulation and control theories. Design: A two-group experimental design with random assignment was used. Sample: Women with a diagnosis of PTL (N = 99) and a fetal gestational age of 19 to 30 weeks comprised the final sample. A power level of .80, with an estimated effect size of .30, and a significance level of .05 (Cohen, 1977) was used to determine the sample size with additional subjects enrolled to account for potential attrition. A total of 106 women were enrolled. Setting: Women were enrolled in two regional high-risk perinatal centers. Intervention and Outcome Variables: Based on the theoretical framework, an informational-behavioral program that focused on addressing discrepancies in women’s experiences of PTL and removing some of the barriers to coping was used. Women in the MOST group also were given activities including a journal called “Me and My Baby” that reinforced information and focused on markers of growth in self, the pregnancy, and the baby. Control group information focused on usual care. Outcome and process variables including anxiety, pregnancy anxiety, depression, mood state, problem-solving, and maternal beliefs about their ability to monitor the psychological and physiological transition to motherhood were assessed prenatally to determine short-term effects of the intervention. Maternal anxiety, depression, mood state, evaluation of the parenting experience, and problem-solving were measured postpartum to determine potential long-term effects. Measures/Instruments: Women received the MOST or Control intervention by audiotape and matching written information at intake followed by a booster intervention within 2 weeks. Outcomes were measured at 3 times during pregnancy and at 3-4 weeks after their infants were discharged home using valid and reliable instruments. Findings/Conclusions: Women who received the MOST program reported: (a) less depression, negative mood state, and stronger maternal beliefs during pregnancy; and (b) more positive evaluations of parenting, increased centrality of the infant, and more skillful problem-solving regarding infant care 3-4 weeks post infant discharge than women in the control program. The theoretically-based MOST program resulted in improved short- and long-term effects on maternal coping outcomes. Implications: The theoretical approach was extended to a new population and provided explanations for MOST program effects on short- and long-term outcomes. The reproducible MOST intervention program could be implemented and evaluated in clinical settings to address maternal coping outcomes with preterm labor.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaternal coping with preterm labor: An interventionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150200-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Maternal coping with preterm labor: An intervention</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Feinstein, Nancy</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Rochester</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Senior Research Associate</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nancy_feinstein@urmc.rochester</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Women with preterm labor (PTL) experience multiple stressors that result in anxiety, mood changes and depression during pregnancy. This has implications for the pregnancy experience and may impact on emotions and functioning after pregnancy. Despite the fact that 20% of women experience PTL with its associated negative impact, there is a paucity of theoretically-driven intervention studies designed to promote maternal coping during this type of high-risk pregnancy. The major purpose of this study was to test an intervention designed to improve maternal coping outcomes. The specific aims were to: (a) evaluate the effects of an experimental program (MOST: Monitoring of Self Through Transition) on emotional and functional outcomes of women with PTL; and (b) evaluate the coping process through a theoretical framework comprised of self-regulation and control theories. Design: A two-group experimental design with random assignment was used. Sample: Women with a diagnosis of PTL (N = 99) and a fetal gestational age of 19 to 30 weeks comprised the final sample. A power level of .80, with an estimated effect size of .30, and a significance level of .05 (Cohen, 1977) was used to determine the sample size with additional subjects enrolled to account for potential attrition. A total of 106 women were enrolled. Setting: Women were enrolled in two regional high-risk perinatal centers. Intervention and Outcome Variables: Based on the theoretical framework, an informational-behavioral program that focused on addressing discrepancies in women&rsquo;s experiences of PTL and removing some of the barriers to coping was used. Women in the MOST group also were given activities including a journal called &ldquo;Me and My Baby&rdquo; that reinforced information and focused on markers of growth in self, the pregnancy, and the baby. Control group information focused on usual care. Outcome and process variables including anxiety, pregnancy anxiety, depression, mood state, problem-solving, and maternal beliefs about their ability to monitor the psychological and physiological transition to motherhood were assessed prenatally to determine short-term effects of the intervention. Maternal anxiety, depression, mood state, evaluation of the parenting experience, and problem-solving were measured postpartum to determine potential long-term effects. Measures/Instruments: Women received the MOST or Control intervention by audiotape and matching written information at intake followed by a booster intervention within 2 weeks. Outcomes were measured at 3 times during pregnancy and at 3-4 weeks after their infants were discharged home using valid and reliable instruments. Findings/Conclusions: Women who received the MOST program reported: (a) less depression, negative mood state, and stronger maternal beliefs during pregnancy; and (b) more positive evaluations of parenting, increased centrality of the infant, and more skillful problem-solving regarding infant care 3-4 weeks post infant discharge than women in the control program. The theoretically-based MOST program resulted in improved short- and long-term effects on maternal coping outcomes. Implications: The theoretical approach was extended to a new population and provided explanations for MOST program effects on short- and long-term outcomes. The reproducible MOST intervention program could be implemented and evaluated in clinical settings to address maternal coping outcomes with preterm labor.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:18:47Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:18:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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