Videotaping Shift Report: Exploring Individual and Dyad Interactions

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150204
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Videotaping Shift Report: Exploring Individual and Dyad Interactions
Abstract:
Videotaping Shift Report: Exploring Individual and Dyad Interactions
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Hays, M.
P.I. Institution Name:University of Alabama in Huntsville
Objective: This study seeks to explore the observed individual and dyad interaction behaviors of RN leaders and followers as they listen and respond to each other during shift report. Design: The situational leadership theory (SLT) of Hersey and Blanchard guided the single-case design. The Target Behavior Instrument (TBI), based on the Interaction Influence Analysis (IIA) developed by Hersey and Keilty, was used to identify and score effective leader, effective follower, and ineffective follower interaction behaviors. The TBI, which is a method of systematically examining the observed behaviors between leaders and followers, separates the events into behaviors and patterns. Sixteen separate shift reports were video recorded in 19 days because repeated, frequent measures are one method of searching for variability in behavior (Barlow & Hersen, 1984). Interactions were measured by the frequencies of the verbal and nonverbal behaviors, the behavioral patterns, and specific behaviors ratios. Recordings were analyzed in real-time using a test-retest procedure. Observation of the staff was done during the unit’s normal verbal intershift report. Sample: The sample consisted of the voluntary participation of four charge nurse RNs (leaders) and 13 staff RNs (followers) from the evening 12-hour shift on one medical- surgical intensive care unit in an urban hospital located in a southeastern state. Twelve shift reports with four leaders and 13 followers were analyzed. Setting: The report was observed in its natural clinical setting at its usual site, a conference room, and a small digital video camera recorder was placed on a tripod at the end of the rectangular table. There were three chairs on both sides of the table. The RN leader sat at the opposite end; the RN followers occupied the chairs along the side. The investigator, who was independent of the hospital unit, began the recording, and then left the room. The same camera angle and natural lighting were used in each videotaping. Names of Variables or Concept: Three behavioral categories and 10 observable behaviors composed the variables under study, including effective leader behaviors, such as directing, questioning (open and closed), and supporting; effective follower behaviors, such as attentive listening, accepting, and rational responding. Ineffective follower behaviors, such as nonattentive listening, rejecting, and irrational responding were additional variables. Measures/Instruments: The TBI was utilized as the instrument to examine the RN behaviors. The first two video recordings established a baseline of the leader-follower behavioral interactions. Twelve videos were analyzed with the 3rd and 4th min of each video recording examined by the investigator and a communications expert. Each interaction between the leader and a follower was scored according to 1 of the 10 TBI behaviors. The unit of analysis was the verbal and nonverbal exchange between the leader-follower dyad, independent of length. Findings: A total of 324 behavioral interactions (RN leaders = 162, RN followers = 162) were documented in the 24 minutes analyzed. An average of 13.5 interactions occurred per minute. An exploratory analysis using repeated measures indicated instruction giving dominated, with the leaders exhibiting a limited range of behaviors. Supporting behaviors between the dyads were few; none were seen in the leaders. Greater variance was observed in the behavioral interactions of the leaders. Employment history, experience, education, and age were influencing variables. Unexpected findings included differences in the group energy levels, collegiality, and the influence of gender on behaviors. Conclusions: Even with few interactions, individuals and dyads displayed similar behaviors, demonstrating variability of behavior across dyads, but individual and within-dyad stability. However, different groups displayed remarkably dissimilar behaviors depending on the leader and the composition. Therefore, the ability of the participants to demonstrate various types of behaviors and patterns is even more significant than the number of the interactions. Implications: Demonstrating relationships and communicating in a manner that enlists cooperation, accuracy, and productivity may be more important than in-depth clinical knowledge. Variables that influence relationships may predict the follower’s willingness as well as the unit’s cohesiveness, satisfaction, outcome quality, and retention. Videotaping would be a useful educational intervention. Further, using the shift report as an evaluation tool would increase individual and unit accountability.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleVideotaping Shift Report: Exploring Individual and Dyad Interactionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150204-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Videotaping Shift Report: Exploring Individual and Dyad Interactions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hays, M.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Alabama in Huntsville</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">haysm@email.uah.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: This study seeks to explore the observed individual and dyad interaction behaviors of RN leaders and followers as they listen and respond to each other during shift report. Design: The situational leadership theory (SLT) of Hersey and Blanchard guided the single-case design. The Target Behavior Instrument (TBI), based on the Interaction Influence Analysis (IIA) developed by Hersey and Keilty, was used to identify and score effective leader, effective follower, and ineffective follower interaction behaviors. The TBI, which is a method of systematically examining the observed behaviors between leaders and followers, separates the events into behaviors and patterns. Sixteen separate shift reports were video recorded in 19 days because repeated, frequent measures are one method of searching for variability in behavior (Barlow &amp; Hersen, 1984). Interactions were measured by the frequencies of the verbal and nonverbal behaviors, the behavioral patterns, and specific behaviors ratios. Recordings were analyzed in real-time using a test-retest procedure. Observation of the staff was done during the unit&rsquo;s normal verbal intershift report. Sample: The sample consisted of the voluntary participation of four charge nurse RNs (leaders) and 13 staff RNs (followers) from the evening 12-hour shift on one medical- surgical intensive care unit in an urban hospital located in a southeastern state. Twelve shift reports with four leaders and 13 followers were analyzed. Setting: The report was observed in its natural clinical setting at its usual site, a conference room, and a small digital video camera recorder was placed on a tripod at the end of the rectangular table. There were three chairs on both sides of the table. The RN leader sat at the opposite end; the RN followers occupied the chairs along the side. The investigator, who was independent of the hospital unit, began the recording, and then left the room. The same camera angle and natural lighting were used in each videotaping. Names of Variables or Concept: Three behavioral categories and 10 observable behaviors composed the variables under study, including effective leader behaviors, such as directing, questioning (open and closed), and supporting; effective follower behaviors, such as attentive listening, accepting, and rational responding. Ineffective follower behaviors, such as nonattentive listening, rejecting, and irrational responding were additional variables. Measures/Instruments: The TBI was utilized as the instrument to examine the RN behaviors. The first two video recordings established a baseline of the leader-follower behavioral interactions. Twelve videos were analyzed with the 3rd and 4th min of each video recording examined by the investigator and a communications expert. Each interaction between the leader and a follower was scored according to 1 of the 10 TBI behaviors. The unit of analysis was the verbal and nonverbal exchange between the leader-follower dyad, independent of length. Findings: A total of 324 behavioral interactions (RN leaders = 162, RN followers = 162) were documented in the 24 minutes analyzed. An average of 13.5 interactions occurred per minute. An exploratory analysis using repeated measures indicated instruction giving dominated, with the leaders exhibiting a limited range of behaviors. Supporting behaviors between the dyads were few; none were seen in the leaders. Greater variance was observed in the behavioral interactions of the leaders. Employment history, experience, education, and age were influencing variables. Unexpected findings included differences in the group energy levels, collegiality, and the influence of gender on behaviors. Conclusions: Even with few interactions, individuals and dyads displayed similar behaviors, demonstrating variability of behavior across dyads, but individual and within-dyad stability. However, different groups displayed remarkably dissimilar behaviors depending on the leader and the composition. Therefore, the ability of the participants to demonstrate various types of behaviors and patterns is even more significant than the number of the interactions. Implications: Demonstrating relationships and communicating in a manner that enlists cooperation, accuracy, and productivity may be more important than in-depth clinical knowledge. Variables that influence relationships may predict the follower&rsquo;s willingness as well as the unit&rsquo;s cohesiveness, satisfaction, outcome quality, and retention. Videotaping would be a useful educational intervention. Further, using the shift report as an evaluation tool would increase individual and unit accountability.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:18:53Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:18:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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