The nursing staff mix outcomes study: Outcomes of system change experienced by registered nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150207
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The nursing staff mix outcomes study: Outcomes of system change experienced by registered nurses
Abstract:
The nursing staff mix outcomes study: Outcomes of system change experienced by registered nurses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Hall, Linda
P.I. Institution Name:University of Toronto
Objective: Major changes have occurred as hospitals redesigned patient care systems and processes, often introducing new nursing staff mixes and models for providing care. The objective of the study was to describe nursing staff mix models and organizational changes that have been implemented in inpatient care settings in 19 teaching hospitals in Ontario, Canada and to evaluate, through the identification, collection and analysis of measurable outcome indicators, the impact of nursing staff mix models and organizational changes on the system, patient and the nurse in these hospitals. Methods: A descriptive, repeated measures design was used to determine the association between organizational change, staffing model components and nurse, patient and system outcomes. Sampling: A purposive sampling strategy was used to achieve the registered nurse sample for this study. Using a random sampling method, registered nurses from each of the 77 patient care units involved in the study were recruited, until the desired sample of 14 nurse subjects from each of the study units was obtained. These registered nurses then completed a survey questionnaire relating to the nurse outcomes of job stress, role tension, and job satisfaction. A total of 1116 registered nurses participated in the study. Setting: The sample comprises hospitals, selected patients within those hospitals and nurses providing care to the sampled patients. To control for hospital level factors known to influence patient and system outcomes, such as bed size, teaching status and geographic location (urban, non-urban), data was collected from patients admitted to 19 urban teaching hospitals in Ontario hospitals, and nurses providing care to them. Limiting participation to these sites reduces any variation in patient, nurse and system outcome that may be due to hospital level factors. One potential source of variation in outcome related to the hospital, the organizational change model, was quantified and studied for all participating hospitals. Names of Variables: The nurse outcome variables examined in this study include nursing job satisfaction, job stress and role tension. Job satisfaction was measured using the Job Descriptive Index (Ironson et al, 1989); job stress was measured using the Job Stress Index (Smith et al., 1992), and role tension with Lyons Tension Index (Lyons, 1971), all measures with demonstrated reliability and validity in previous studies as well as in this study. Findings: This presentation will focus on the results of the nursing component of the research study - outcomes of these system changes as experienced by registered nurses. The quality of care provided by nurses on the unit was found to have a statistically significant positive influence on nurses’ perceptions of job satisfaction (t =.571; p=.0001), and a statistically significant negative influence on nurses perceptions of job pressure (t =.-3.78; p=.0008), and job threat (t =.-3.72; p=.0009). Programming approaches for the coordination of care had a statistically significant negative influence on nurses’ perceptions of job satisfaction (t =-2.16; p=.04), and a statistically significant positive influence on nurses’ perceptions of job pressure (t =.2.40; p=.02). Finally, nursing leadership was found to have a statistically significant positive influence on nurses’ perceptions of job satisfaction (t =4.88; p=.0001), and a statistically significant negative influence on nurses’ perceptions of job pressure (t =.-3.57; p=.004), job threat (t =.-4.58; p<.001), and role tension (t =.-7.16; p<.0001). Conclusions: Thus, this research suggests that nursing job satisfaction is influenced by the environment in which nurses work. As well, mechanisms used for the coordination of patient care activities influences nurses’ job satisfaction and job stress. Finally, nursing leadership at the unit level is an important component in nurses work satisfaction. Implications: The study results provide important information on the influence of organizational change strategies and nursing staff mix model on nurse outcomes. The implications of these findings for nurses and the nursing profession will be discussed and suggestions for policy changes will be presented.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe nursing staff mix outcomes study: Outcomes of system change experienced by registered nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150207-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The nursing staff mix outcomes study: Outcomes of system change experienced by registered nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hall, Linda</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Toronto</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">l.mcgillishall@utoronto.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Major changes have occurred as hospitals redesigned patient care systems and processes, often introducing new nursing staff mixes and models for providing care. The objective of the study was to describe nursing staff mix models and organizational changes that have been implemented in inpatient care settings in 19 teaching hospitals in Ontario, Canada and to evaluate, through the identification, collection and analysis of measurable outcome indicators, the impact of nursing staff mix models and organizational changes on the system, patient and the nurse in these hospitals. Methods: A descriptive, repeated measures design was used to determine the association between organizational change, staffing model components and nurse, patient and system outcomes. Sampling: A purposive sampling strategy was used to achieve the registered nurse sample for this study. Using a random sampling method, registered nurses from each of the 77 patient care units involved in the study were recruited, until the desired sample of 14 nurse subjects from each of the study units was obtained. These registered nurses then completed a survey questionnaire relating to the nurse outcomes of job stress, role tension, and job satisfaction. A total of 1116 registered nurses participated in the study. Setting: The sample comprises hospitals, selected patients within those hospitals and nurses providing care to the sampled patients. To control for hospital level factors known to influence patient and system outcomes, such as bed size, teaching status and geographic location (urban, non-urban), data was collected from patients admitted to 19 urban teaching hospitals in Ontario hospitals, and nurses providing care to them. Limiting participation to these sites reduces any variation in patient, nurse and system outcome that may be due to hospital level factors. One potential source of variation in outcome related to the hospital, the organizational change model, was quantified and studied for all participating hospitals. Names of Variables: The nurse outcome variables examined in this study include nursing job satisfaction, job stress and role tension. Job satisfaction was measured using the Job Descriptive Index (Ironson et al, 1989); job stress was measured using the Job Stress Index (Smith et al., 1992), and role tension with Lyons Tension Index (Lyons, 1971), all measures with demonstrated reliability and validity in previous studies as well as in this study. Findings: This presentation will focus on the results of the nursing component of the research study - outcomes of these system changes as experienced by registered nurses. The quality of care provided by nurses on the unit was found to have a statistically significant positive influence on nurses&rsquo; perceptions of job satisfaction (t =.571; p=.0001), and a statistically significant negative influence on nurses perceptions of job pressure (t =.-3.78; p=.0008), and job threat (t =.-3.72; p=.0009). Programming approaches for the coordination of care had a statistically significant negative influence on nurses&rsquo; perceptions of job satisfaction (t =-2.16; p=.04), and a statistically significant positive influence on nurses&rsquo; perceptions of job pressure (t =.2.40; p=.02). Finally, nursing leadership was found to have a statistically significant positive influence on nurses&rsquo; perceptions of job satisfaction (t =4.88; p=.0001), and a statistically significant negative influence on nurses&rsquo; perceptions of job pressure (t =.-3.57; p=.004), job threat (t =.-4.58; p&lt;.001), and role tension (t =.-7.16; p&lt;.0001). Conclusions: Thus, this research suggests that nursing job satisfaction is influenced by the environment in which nurses work. As well, mechanisms used for the coordination of patient care activities influences nurses&rsquo; job satisfaction and job stress. Finally, nursing leadership at the unit level is an important component in nurses work satisfaction. Implications: The study results provide important information on the influence of organizational change strategies and nursing staff mix model on nurse outcomes. The implications of these findings for nurses and the nursing profession will be discussed and suggestions for policy changes will be presented.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:18:57Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:18:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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