Determinants of Physical Punishment Use with Children: Implications for Parent Education

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150212
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Determinants of Physical Punishment Use with Children: Implications for Parent Education
Abstract:
Determinants of Physical Punishment Use with Children: Implications for Parent Education
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Ateah, Christine, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Manitoba
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the roles of cognition and affect in maternal use of physical punishment. Findings can be used for the development of parent education to decrease physical punishment use and the negative developmental consequences, such as physical child abuse, associated with it. Design: A cross-sectional survey design was used for this study of the determinants of maternal use of physical punishment. Data were collected between June and September, 1999 through interviews conducted by the researcher and occurring in subjects’ homes. Subjects were selected through a mixture of random and convenience sampling techniques from an initial random sample. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess the relative individual contributions of both distal and proximal predictors of physical punishment use. Sample & Setting: The sample consisted of 110 mothers of 3-year old, first-born children who lived in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Variables & Measures: Independent distal variables were: maternal personal history of physical punishment, approval of physical punishment, knowledge of child development, and repertoire of positive disciplinary responses. The independent proximal variables were: maternal perception of seriousness and intent of misbehaviour, affect, and goals. The dependent variable was maternal use of physical punishment in the two weeks preceding the interview. Both pre-existing and modified measures were utilized. Findings: The distal variable of maternal attitude toward physical punishment and the proximal maternal variables of perceived seriousness and intent of the child misbehaviour and anger in response to the child misbehaviour predicted physical punishment use. Logistic regression analysis was conducted on a modified social information-processing model that included both cognitive and affective predictors of physical punishment use. This model explained 53% of the variance in physical punishment use. Conclusions: The identification of key components of the decision making process in disciplinary situations can be utilized to establish priorities in educational programming aimed at decreasing the rates of parental use of physical punishment and child physical abuse. The nursing profession is in a key role to promote the use of positive disciplinary strategies for parents to use with their children either through formal or informal processes. Implications: In addition to presenting alternatives to physical punishment, parent education programming should include: information on the negative developmental outcomes of physical punishment use, anger self-management techniques for parents, and expected child development and behaviours.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeterminants of Physical Punishment Use with Children: Implications for Parent Educationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150212-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Determinants of Physical Punishment Use with Children: Implications for Parent Education</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ateah, Christine, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Manitoba</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">christine_ateah@umanitoba.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the roles of cognition and affect in maternal use of physical punishment. Findings can be used for the development of parent education to decrease physical punishment use and the negative developmental consequences, such as physical child abuse, associated with it. Design: A cross-sectional survey design was used for this study of the determinants of maternal use of physical punishment. Data were collected between June and September, 1999 through interviews conducted by the researcher and occurring in subjects&rsquo; homes. Subjects were selected through a mixture of random and convenience sampling techniques from an initial random sample. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess the relative individual contributions of both distal and proximal predictors of physical punishment use. Sample &amp; Setting: The sample consisted of 110 mothers of 3-year old, first-born children who lived in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Variables &amp; Measures: Independent distal variables were: maternal personal history of physical punishment, approval of physical punishment, knowledge of child development, and repertoire of positive disciplinary responses. The independent proximal variables were: maternal perception of seriousness and intent of misbehaviour, affect, and goals. The dependent variable was maternal use of physical punishment in the two weeks preceding the interview. Both pre-existing and modified measures were utilized. Findings: The distal variable of maternal attitude toward physical punishment and the proximal maternal variables of perceived seriousness and intent of the child misbehaviour and anger in response to the child misbehaviour predicted physical punishment use. Logistic regression analysis was conducted on a modified social information-processing model that included both cognitive and affective predictors of physical punishment use. This model explained 53% of the variance in physical punishment use. Conclusions: The identification of key components of the decision making process in disciplinary situations can be utilized to establish priorities in educational programming aimed at decreasing the rates of parental use of physical punishment and child physical abuse. The nursing profession is in a key role to promote the use of positive disciplinary strategies for parents to use with their children either through formal or informal processes. Implications: In addition to presenting alternatives to physical punishment, parent education programming should include: information on the negative developmental outcomes of physical punishment use, anger self-management techniques for parents, and expected child development and behaviours.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:19:04Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:19:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.