The Effects of Culture on Nursing Values and Job-Related Burnout

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150214
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of Culture on Nursing Values and Job-Related Burnout
Abstract:
The Effects of Culture on Nursing Values and Job-Related Burnout
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Flynn, Linda
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pennsylvania
Purpose: Due to nursing shortages, increased recruitment of international nurses, originating from cultures distinctly different from the United States, is expected. One literature suggests that differing cultures can contribute to differing and perhaps conflicting professional nursing values; a second literature suggests that nursing shares a set of care values that transcends culture. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of culture on professional nursing values and job-related burnout. Design: A secondary analysis of survey data was conducted within a sample of 799 nurses; 547 were born in the U.S. and 252 were international nurses representing 34 countries of origin. Methods: Culture of origin was coded according to Hofstede’s classification system. Nursing values related to the professional practice environment were measured using the Nursing Work Index, and burnout was measured using the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Analysis of variance and least-squares regression procedures were used to test hypotheses. Findings: There were no significant differences between U.S. and international nurses in the overall degree to which they valued a professional nursing practice environment. A professional nursing practice environment had a significant, inverse effect on job-related burnout in nurses from both cultures. Conclusions: These findings challenge a prevailing sentiment that international nurses hold values inconsistent with professional practice models as defined in the American context. Findings also suggest that the absence of a professional practice environment will produce the same high levels of burnout among both U.S. and international nurses. In light of the nursing shortage, policy implications include the reshaping of hospital environments in ways consistent with professional practice models.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of Culture on Nursing Values and Job-Related Burnouten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150214-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects of Culture on Nursing Values and Job-Related Burnout</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Flynn, Linda</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pennsylvania</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lflynn@nursing.upenn.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Due to nursing shortages, increased recruitment of international nurses, originating from cultures distinctly different from the United States, is expected. One literature suggests that differing cultures can contribute to differing and perhaps conflicting professional nursing values; a second literature suggests that nursing shares a set of care values that transcends culture. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of culture on professional nursing values and job-related burnout. Design: A secondary analysis of survey data was conducted within a sample of 799 nurses; 547 were born in the U.S. and 252 were international nurses representing 34 countries of origin. Methods: Culture of origin was coded according to Hofstede&rsquo;s classification system. Nursing values related to the professional practice environment were measured using the Nursing Work Index, and burnout was measured using the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Analysis of variance and least-squares regression procedures were used to test hypotheses. Findings: There were no significant differences between U.S. and international nurses in the overall degree to which they valued a professional nursing practice environment. A professional nursing practice environment had a significant, inverse effect on job-related burnout in nurses from both cultures. Conclusions: These findings challenge a prevailing sentiment that international nurses hold values inconsistent with professional practice models as defined in the American context. Findings also suggest that the absence of a professional practice environment will produce the same high levels of burnout among both U.S. and international nurses. In light of the nursing shortage, policy implications include the reshaping of hospital environments in ways consistent with professional practice models.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:19:07Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:19:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.