The role of job perceptions, attitudes, and economic and demographic factors on RN work participation and setting

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150215
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The role of job perceptions, attitudes, and economic and demographic factors on RN work participation and setting
Abstract:
The role of job perceptions, attitudes, and economic and demographic factors on RN work participation and setting
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Brewer, Carol, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Buffalo
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: This paper examines the relationship of attitudinal, work perception, economic and demographic factors to the work participation and setting of RNs. Design: Non-experimental survey research. Sample: A randomly selected sample of 1500 RN's under age 66resulted in 1482 deliverable surveys. Currently working RNs were 671 of 802 returned surveys (response rate = 54.1%). Setting: Eight counties of Western New York. Names of Variables or Concepts: Dependent variables were 1) full-time vs. part-time work participation, and 2) hospital vs. non-hospital employment setting. Measures/instruments: Three models were analyzed using bivariate and ordinary probit and logistic regression for each set of dependent variables. Model 1 contained control variables which were: age, race, presence of a full-time or part-time spousal participation, number of children under 6, student status, level of education, presence of certification in a specialty, educated in Western New York, and years of RN experience. Model 2 included all measured variables, and Model 3 incorporated the variables in Model 1 plus significant (p=.10) variables from Model 2. Complete data for all three models resulted in n=360. Findings: For all bivariate probit models, rho was non-significant, indicating that the full-time/part-time and hospital/non-hospital work status was not correlated. For all probit and logistic analyses, model 1 explained the least variance, but neither Models 2 nor 3 was a clearly superior model. The variables significantly and positively related to the full time work participation were an educator or administrator position and the number of job benefits. The variables significantly and negatively related to the full time work participation were full-time or unemployed spouse, worked in urban counties of Western New York, log of average wage and less satisfied than last year. The variables significantly and positively related to the hospital work setting were full-time spouse, job tenure, number of job benefits, the log of the average wage, and reduction in RN staff without nursing replacement. The variables significantly and negatively related to the hospital work setting were age between 50 and 59, an educator position, and work satisfaction. Conclusions: Separate factors are important in determining full-time/part-time and hospital/non-hospital work states for RNs. The wage was positively related to hospital setting but a negative income effect was evident for full-time work. The number of benefits also was an important explanation of full-time work participation. However, satisfaction and job perceptions may be particularly important in explaining the RNs' work setting, while not important in full-time or part-time workforce participation. The influence of the age 50-59 RN group in hospital labor supply should be noted. Implications: It is particularly important to note that increasing the work participation of RNs may require different strategies than increasing the numbers of nurses that work in hospitals. If these results also hold during shortages of RNs, increasing benefits rather than wages may attract full-time nurses. A hospital wage differential may be crucial to attracting nurses to a hospital vs. non-hospital setting. This finding may be crucial to unionized hospital systems. Improving hospital nurse satisfaction and retention programs aimed at the older hospital RNs should be a prime consideration of administrators.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe role of job perceptions, attitudes, and economic and demographic factors on RN work participation and settingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150215-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The role of job perceptions, attitudes, and economic and demographic factors on RN work participation and setting</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brewer, Carol, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Buffalo</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">csbrewer@buffalo.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: This paper examines the relationship of attitudinal, work perception, economic and demographic factors to the work participation and setting of RNs. Design: Non-experimental survey research. Sample: A randomly selected sample of 1500 RN's under age 66resulted in 1482 deliverable surveys. Currently working RNs were 671 of 802 returned surveys (response rate = 54.1%). Setting: Eight counties of Western New York. Names of Variables or Concepts: Dependent variables were 1) full-time vs. part-time work participation, and 2) hospital vs. non-hospital employment setting. Measures/instruments: Three models were analyzed using bivariate and ordinary probit and logistic regression for each set of dependent variables. Model 1 contained control variables which were: age, race, presence of a full-time or part-time spousal participation, number of children under 6, student status, level of education, presence of certification in a specialty, educated in Western New York, and years of RN experience. Model 2 included all measured variables, and Model 3 incorporated the variables in Model 1 plus significant (p=.10) variables from Model 2. Complete data for all three models resulted in n=360. Findings: For all bivariate probit models, rho was non-significant, indicating that the full-time/part-time and hospital/non-hospital work status was not correlated. For all probit and logistic analyses, model 1 explained the least variance, but neither Models 2 nor 3 was a clearly superior model. The variables significantly and positively related to the full time work participation were an educator or administrator position and the number of job benefits. The variables significantly and negatively related to the full time work participation were full-time or unemployed spouse, worked in urban counties of Western New York, log of average wage and less satisfied than last year. The variables significantly and positively related to the hospital work setting were full-time spouse, job tenure, number of job benefits, the log of the average wage, and reduction in RN staff without nursing replacement. The variables significantly and negatively related to the hospital work setting were age between 50 and 59, an educator position, and work satisfaction. Conclusions: Separate factors are important in determining full-time/part-time and hospital/non-hospital work states for RNs. The wage was positively related to hospital setting but a negative income effect was evident for full-time work. The number of benefits also was an important explanation of full-time work participation. However, satisfaction and job perceptions may be particularly important in explaining the RNs' work setting, while not important in full-time or part-time workforce participation. The influence of the age 50-59 RN group in hospital labor supply should be noted. Implications: It is particularly important to note that increasing the work participation of RNs may require different strategies than increasing the numbers of nurses that work in hospitals. If these results also hold during shortages of RNs, increasing benefits rather than wages may attract full-time nurses. A hospital wage differential may be crucial to attracting nurses to a hospital vs. non-hospital setting. This finding may be crucial to unionized hospital systems. Improving hospital nurse satisfaction and retention programs aimed at the older hospital RNs should be a prime consideration of administrators.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:19:09Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:19:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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