2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150218
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Do Injured Drinking Drivers Tell the Truth about Alcohol?
Abstract:
Do Injured Drinking Drivers Tell the Truth about Alcohol?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Sommers, Marilyn, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Cincinnati
Title:Professor
Background: Of the more than 40,000 Americans killed each in vehicular crashes, 40% are involved in alcohol-related collisions. Self-reported alcohol use has become an anchor for alcohol intervention following traffic crashes, although clinicians are often skeptical about the truthfulness of self-report. Objective: To determine the validity of self-reported alcohol consumption of vehicular occupants hospitalized for a serious, alcohol-related injury. Methods: Non-alcohol dependent subjects 18 and older who were injured in motor vehicle crashes (N=181) were interviewed. The self-reported number of standard drinks, time that drinking commenced, sex and weight were used to calculate estimated blood alcohol concentration (EBAC), which was then compared to the admission blood alcohol concentration (BAC). Results: We had data to calculate the EBAC on 120 of the 181 subjects. Seven males and no females with positive (> 10 mg/dL) denied drinking. Of the 113 subjects for whom we had data to calculate EBAC and who acknowledged drinking, mean BAC was 158.67 mg/dL and mean EBAC was 83.81 mg/dL (females: mean BAC=164.74mg/dL, mean EBAC=144.44mg/dL; males: mean BAC=156.77 mg/dL, mean EBAC=64.77. Spearman’s rho between BAC and EBAC was 0.254 (p <0.01) for all subjects (n=113), 0.020 (n.s.) for females and 0.324 (p<0.01 for males. We performed multiple regression analyses and found that for women, weight and number of drinks accounted for 3% of the variance in laboratory BAC (R=0.174, F=0.623, df=2, 40, n.s.) In contrast, for men these same predictors accounted for 29% of the variance (R = 0.543, F = 27.71, df = 2, 128, p =< .001). Conclusions: After vehicular injury, females and males have different patterns of reporting their drinking. Males are more accurate but frequently under-report drinking whereas females also under-report but are more random in their self-reports.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDo Injured Drinking Drivers Tell the Truth about Alcohol?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150218-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Do Injured Drinking Drivers Tell the Truth about Alcohol?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sommers, Marilyn, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Cincinnati</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lynn.sommers@uc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Of the more than 40,000 Americans killed each in vehicular crashes, 40% are involved in alcohol-related collisions. Self-reported alcohol use has become an anchor for alcohol intervention following traffic crashes, although clinicians are often skeptical about the truthfulness of self-report. Objective: To determine the validity of self-reported alcohol consumption of vehicular occupants hospitalized for a serious, alcohol-related injury. Methods: Non-alcohol dependent subjects 18 and older who were injured in motor vehicle crashes (N=181) were interviewed. The self-reported number of standard drinks, time that drinking commenced, sex and weight were used to calculate estimated blood alcohol concentration (EBAC), which was then compared to the admission blood alcohol concentration (BAC). Results: We had data to calculate the EBAC on 120 of the 181 subjects. Seven males and no females with positive (&gt; 10 mg/dL) denied drinking. Of the 113 subjects for whom we had data to calculate EBAC and who acknowledged drinking, mean BAC was 158.67 mg/dL and mean EBAC was 83.81 mg/dL (females: mean BAC=164.74mg/dL, mean EBAC=144.44mg/dL; males: mean BAC=156.77 mg/dL, mean EBAC=64.77. Spearman&rsquo;s rho between BAC and EBAC was 0.254 (p &lt;0.01) for all subjects (n=113), 0.020 (n.s.) for females and 0.324 (p&lt;0.01 for males. We performed multiple regression analyses and found that for women, weight and number of drinks accounted for 3% of the variance in laboratory BAC (R=0.174, F=0.623, df=2, 40, n.s.) In contrast, for men these same predictors accounted for 29% of the variance (R = 0.543, F = 27.71, df = 2, 128, p =&lt; .001). Conclusions: After vehicular injury, females and males have different patterns of reporting their drinking. Males are more accurate but frequently under-report drinking whereas females also under-report but are more random in their self-reports.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:19:13Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:19:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.