2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150221
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Caring in nursing: A critical theory study
Abstract:
Caring in nursing: A critical theory study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Sumner, Jane
P.I. Institution Name:Louisiana State University Health Science Center
This critical theory study explores caring in nursing through the lens of Habermas’ (1995) theory of moral consciousness and communicative action. This theory provides three claims to normative validity: the claim to truth, or factual “assertoric” knowledge; the claim to truthfulness, or the intrasubjective self; and the claim to rightness, or the intersubjective interaction. The interaction is identified as moral, because social dialogue or discourse requires a “considerateness” of each for the other. Habermas draws on Kohlberg’s (1981) and Selman’s (1980) work to develop three levels of moral maturity of communication. These are identified as: preconventional, conventional, and post conventional. When each of the three validity claims are met and there is genuine “considerateness” in the interaction, there is communicative action. The reverse is strategic action, where the communication is coercive. The study attempts to uncover the unquestioned acceptance of traditional ontology, epistemology, moral dimensions, methodology, comforting, and outcomes of nursing caring; question the false consciousness; and identify the gaps in the traditional ethos of nursing. Having developed a theoretical template for analysis, ten “expert” nurses with either advanced nurse practitioner degrees or doctorates were interviewed, in loosely structured interviews. The results suggested that there was a limited recognition of the vulnerability of the personal self of the patient or the nurse. The focus was on the illness needs of the patient, and the nurses “knew” what those expectations were. Meeting these needs propelled the “ought” of nursing care. While “ordinary things” were acknowledged as what the patient wanted, they were not the emphasis. The data also indicated that nurses do not readily acknowledge their own personal self. It is the professional self that is central. Nevertheless, the experts did acknowledge the importance of validation in the role of nurse by the patient, which gave a sense of “specialness.” Caring in nursing is offered as a different paradigm for understanding nursing caring, where the vulnerability of the personal side of both patient and nurse are recognized as an equal part of the interaction. The Spirit of Open Egalitarianism is offered as a model for the practice of caring in nursing. Quadrangular Dialogue is offered as a caring in nursing education model.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCaring in nursing: A critical theory studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150221-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Caring in nursing: A critical theory study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sumner, Jane</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Louisiana State University Health Science Center</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jsumne@lsuhsc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This critical theory study explores caring in nursing through the lens of Habermas&rsquo; (1995) theory of moral consciousness and communicative action. This theory provides three claims to normative validity: the claim to truth, or factual &ldquo;assertoric&rdquo; knowledge; the claim to truthfulness, or the intrasubjective self; and the claim to rightness, or the intersubjective interaction. The interaction is identified as moral, because social dialogue or discourse requires a &ldquo;considerateness&rdquo; of each for the other. Habermas draws on Kohlberg&rsquo;s (1981) and Selman&rsquo;s (1980) work to develop three levels of moral maturity of communication. These are identified as: preconventional, conventional, and post conventional. When each of the three validity claims are met and there is genuine &ldquo;considerateness&rdquo; in the interaction, there is communicative action. The reverse is strategic action, where the communication is coercive. The study attempts to uncover the unquestioned acceptance of traditional ontology, epistemology, moral dimensions, methodology, comforting, and outcomes of nursing caring; question the false consciousness; and identify the gaps in the traditional ethos of nursing. Having developed a theoretical template for analysis, ten &ldquo;expert&rdquo; nurses with either advanced nurse practitioner degrees or doctorates were interviewed, in loosely structured interviews. The results suggested that there was a limited recognition of the vulnerability of the personal self of the patient or the nurse. The focus was on the illness needs of the patient, and the nurses &ldquo;knew&rdquo; what those expectations were. Meeting these needs propelled the &ldquo;ought&rdquo; of nursing care. While &ldquo;ordinary things&rdquo; were acknowledged as what the patient wanted, they were not the emphasis. The data also indicated that nurses do not readily acknowledge their own personal self. It is the professional self that is central. Nevertheless, the experts did acknowledge the importance of validation in the role of nurse by the patient, which gave a sense of &ldquo;specialness.&rdquo; Caring in nursing is offered as a different paradigm for understanding nursing caring, where the vulnerability of the personal side of both patient and nurse are recognized as an equal part of the interaction. The Spirit of Open Egalitarianism is offered as a model for the practice of caring in nursing. Quadrangular Dialogue is offered as a caring in nursing education model.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:19:17Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:19:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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