2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150222
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Artful Nursing in Agonizing Times
Abstract:
Artful Nursing in Agonizing Times
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Gramling, Kathryn
Objective: A distinct portrait of nursing art has not developed in spite of a century-long use of the term. This study sought to increase understanding of artful nursing from the perspective of patients who had been nursed in a critical care unit. Specifically, the study proposed to: 1) generate stories of when nursing was art: 2) describe meanings in patients’ stories of artful nursing experiences and: 3) consider how particular stories would illuminate and be illuminated by Watson’s Theory of Nursing Art. Method: A narrative inquiry was selected to investigate the elusive phenomenon of nursing art. A narrative study has a philosophical basis in phenomenology and hermeneutics. Phenomenology assists in bringing the invisible and taken for granted to light: hermeneutics provides insight into the self-interpreting nature of human beings. Sample and Setting: A purposeful and convenience sample of five men and five women between the ages of 33 and 74 participated in this study. Participants were cared for in an ICU for at least 24 hours; able to remember their critical care experience, able to sustain a conversation in English and were willing to share their story with the researcher. Recruitment was done with the critical care coordinators at a 330-bed acute care facility the Northeast. Most interviews took place in the patients’ homes during recovery. Design: Participants were interviewed twice for the purpose of answering the research question: “When was nursing art?” The researcher listened to each story in the first meeting. After reflection, the researcher then wrote a poem in response to each person’s story. Next, a written version of the verbal story was created. The written story and poem were shared with the participants at the second interview. Further discussion ensued. The open-ended interactive interviews were tape-recorded and analyzed using the hermeneutic phenomenological method of Van Manen. Themes were generated within and across stories. Findings: Participants were able to describe when nursing was art and when it was not based on their critical care experience. Five themes were found to represent these critically-ill persons’ experience of nursing art. They were: 1) Perpetual Presence; 2) Knowing the Other; 3) Intimacy and Agony; 4) Deep Detail and; 5) Honoring the Body. Stories put a human face on theoretical concepts. Conclusions/Implications: Participants were able to describe how nursing art was manifested and received in huge and minute expressions of being and knowing. Nursing art had a healing effect. Lack of art was hurtful to patients. Stories offer fresh language and insight for reflection, discussion and debate. The stories provide visibility, credibility, impetus for research and fodder for the soul of artful practitioners.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleArtful Nursing in Agonizing Timesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150222-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Artful Nursing in Agonizing Times</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gramling, Kathryn</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kpgram@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: A distinct portrait of nursing art has not developed in spite of a century-long use of the term. This study sought to increase understanding of artful nursing from the perspective of patients who had been nursed in a critical care unit. Specifically, the study proposed to: 1) generate stories of when nursing was art: 2) describe meanings in patients&rsquo; stories of artful nursing experiences and: 3) consider how particular stories would illuminate and be illuminated by Watson&rsquo;s Theory of Nursing Art. Method: A narrative inquiry was selected to investigate the elusive phenomenon of nursing art. A narrative study has a philosophical basis in phenomenology and hermeneutics. Phenomenology assists in bringing the invisible and taken for granted to light: hermeneutics provides insight into the self-interpreting nature of human beings. Sample and Setting: A purposeful and convenience sample of five men and five women between the ages of 33 and 74 participated in this study. Participants were cared for in an ICU for at least 24 hours; able to remember their critical care experience, able to sustain a conversation in English and were willing to share their story with the researcher. Recruitment was done with the critical care coordinators at a 330-bed acute care facility the Northeast. Most interviews took place in the patients&rsquo; homes during recovery. Design: Participants were interviewed twice for the purpose of answering the research question: &ldquo;When was nursing art?&rdquo; The researcher listened to each story in the first meeting. After reflection, the researcher then wrote a poem in response to each person&rsquo;s story. Next, a written version of the verbal story was created. The written story and poem were shared with the participants at the second interview. Further discussion ensued. The open-ended interactive interviews were tape-recorded and analyzed using the hermeneutic phenomenological method of Van Manen. Themes were generated within and across stories. Findings: Participants were able to describe when nursing was art and when it was not based on their critical care experience. Five themes were found to represent these critically-ill persons&rsquo; experience of nursing art. They were: 1) Perpetual Presence; 2) Knowing the Other; 3) Intimacy and Agony; 4) Deep Detail and; 5) Honoring the Body. Stories put a human face on theoretical concepts. Conclusions/Implications: Participants were able to describe how nursing art was manifested and received in huge and minute expressions of being and knowing. Nursing art had a healing effect. Lack of art was hurtful to patients. Stories offer fresh language and insight for reflection, discussion and debate. The stories provide visibility, credibility, impetus for research and fodder for the soul of artful practitioners.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:19:19Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:19:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.