2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150228
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mentoring in the Trenches
Abstract:
Mentoring in the Trenches
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Dawkins, Vivian, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Ocean View Care Center of Bandon
Title:Director of Nursing
The purpose of this presentation is to share knowledge gleaned from the field about the strategies and techniques used to develop new nurse leaders. Often nurses are placed in leadership positions as a promotion from clinical activities without thought to how they will be taught the day-to-day skills necessary to fulfill the responsibilities of their role. Using the Scope and Standards for Nurse Administrators developed by the American Nurses Association, real experiences will be shared that highlight the responsibilities and activities of nurse managers and executives. The objectives of the session are to: 1) share and discuss the basic nine principals of human relations developed by Dale Carnegie and essential to leadership; 2) identify the needs of new nurse leaders for learning; 3) provide examples from the field of effective strategies for the implementation of the standards for nurse administrators; and, 4) offer tips on coaching tactics that result in shorter learning times for new leaders. Examples of human relation skills include listening from the others point of view, making people feel important, and showing honest and sincere appreciation. These appear to be simple skills, but they take enormous effort and persistence to implement in a consistent and professional manner. Small group activities will be used to illustrate these skills. Helping new leaders identify their learning needs assists the mentor in identifying ways to coach. An example of this is the new manager who stated, “I’ve only been in my role three weeks and I’m already six months behind”. Assisting the new leader to identify the daily events that quickly envelope even the most experienced leader in unimportant activities also helps them to establish priorities. As definitive as the Scope and Standards for Nursing Administrators is, there remains a gap between what is written and how it translates into daily practice. As an example, the standard on providing leadership in critical thinking, conflict management, and problem solving sounds reasonable. However, it may be difficult for a nurse new to the role to provide effective leadership in conflict management when their first exposure to an angry employee leaves them overwhelmed and shocked. Coaching is a word relatively new to the field of leadership. We have been teaching employees for many years, but coaching requires an element of risk taking that may be uncomfortable for the mentor. Allowing others to make decisions, accept the outcome, and identify additional or alternative decisions, is a hard task for nurses who have been in leadership roles for a while. As is true for our clinical roles, it is often easier, faster, and safer to do things alone than it is to let someone else share the role. Ensuring that the learning is relevant, practical, and results in efficient and effective outcomes is our greatest challenge. This presentation will offer ideas, tips, suggestions, and examples of coaching strategies and mentoring techniques from the experience of a skilled nursing leader and a new Director of Nursing. The material is best presented in a workshop format where there is time and room for the discussing and sharing of effective teaching/learning and coaching techniques and strategies, and for small group break out activities. Presentation of the material will combine lecture, discussion, small group activities, and question and answer time.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMentoring in the Trenchesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150228-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Mentoring in the Trenches</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dawkins, Vivian, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Ocean View Care Center of Bandon</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vpdawkins@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this presentation is to share knowledge gleaned from the field about the strategies and techniques used to develop new nurse leaders. Often nurses are placed in leadership positions as a promotion from clinical activities without thought to how they will be taught the day-to-day skills necessary to fulfill the responsibilities of their role. Using the Scope and Standards for Nurse Administrators developed by the American Nurses Association, real experiences will be shared that highlight the responsibilities and activities of nurse managers and executives. The objectives of the session are to: 1) share and discuss the basic nine principals of human relations developed by Dale Carnegie and essential to leadership; 2) identify the needs of new nurse leaders for learning; 3) provide examples from the field of effective strategies for the implementation of the standards for nurse administrators; and, 4) offer tips on coaching tactics that result in shorter learning times for new leaders. Examples of human relation skills include listening from the others point of view, making people feel important, and showing honest and sincere appreciation. These appear to be simple skills, but they take enormous effort and persistence to implement in a consistent and professional manner. Small group activities will be used to illustrate these skills. Helping new leaders identify their learning needs assists the mentor in identifying ways to coach. An example of this is the new manager who stated, &ldquo;I&rsquo;ve only been in my role three weeks and I&rsquo;m already six months behind&rdquo;. Assisting the new leader to identify the daily events that quickly envelope even the most experienced leader in unimportant activities also helps them to establish priorities. As definitive as the Scope and Standards for Nursing Administrators is, there remains a gap between what is written and how it translates into daily practice. As an example, the standard on providing leadership in critical thinking, conflict management, and problem solving sounds reasonable. However, it may be difficult for a nurse new to the role to provide effective leadership in conflict management when their first exposure to an angry employee leaves them overwhelmed and shocked. Coaching is a word relatively new to the field of leadership. We have been teaching employees for many years, but coaching requires an element of risk taking that may be uncomfortable for the mentor. Allowing others to make decisions, accept the outcome, and identify additional or alternative decisions, is a hard task for nurses who have been in leadership roles for a while. As is true for our clinical roles, it is often easier, faster, and safer to do things alone than it is to let someone else share the role. Ensuring that the learning is relevant, practical, and results in efficient and effective outcomes is our greatest challenge. This presentation will offer ideas, tips, suggestions, and examples of coaching strategies and mentoring techniques from the experience of a skilled nursing leader and a new Director of Nursing. The material is best presented in a workshop format where there is time and room for the discussing and sharing of effective teaching/learning and coaching techniques and strategies, and for small group break out activities. Presentation of the material will combine lecture, discussion, small group activities, and question and answer time.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:19:27Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:19:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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