Aboriginal-Cultural Research and Diabetes Mellitus: Viewing the World through Coyotes' Eyes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150242
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Aboriginal-Cultural Research and Diabetes Mellitus: Viewing the World through Coyotes' Eyes
Abstract:
Aboriginal-Cultural Research and Diabetes Mellitus: Viewing the World through Coyotes' Eyes
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Barton, Sylvia S., RN, MScN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Northern British Columbia
Title:Assistant Professor
Purpose: To analyze critically the research literature relevant to diabetes mellitus in Canada's First Nations, with particular attention to epistemological and methodological frameworks, gaps, and silences. Organizing Construct: Coyote Stories. Naturalistic metaphors embedded in Aboriginal traditions, which represent a particular kind of knowledge, were viewed as integral to Aboriginal epistemology. Method: This integrative literature review includes an extensive search of published literature relevant to diabetes in Canada's First Nations between 1990 and 2002. Over 130 articles were initially identified, 102 could be categorized according to topics that focused on understanding diabetes as a progressing epidemic, and 42 articles were selected that represented a cross-section of topic areas. Findings: Studies were organized into categories of quantitative articles that included survey reports, clinical and prevalence studies, and community surveys related to the epidemiological characteristics and causes of diabetes in First Nations populations. Categories of qualitative articles included a focus on cultural beliefs, values, and meanings based on eliciting First Nations peoples' perspectives related to the experience of living with diabetes. Studies revealed research approaches that focused on frameworks uninformed by Aboriginal epistemology. Conclusions: Invaluable empirical diabetes research exists, but theoretically grounded studies in collaboration with Aboriginal people are imperative for the future. Inclusion of Aboriginal knowledge, expansion of associated cultural and contextual analyses, and experimentation with participatory research approaches would contribute to the development of culturally competent scholarship. Theory and research, as well as practice and policy implications are discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAboriginal-Cultural Research and Diabetes Mellitus: Viewing the World through Coyotes' Eyesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150242-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Aboriginal-Cultural Research and Diabetes Mellitus: Viewing the World through Coyotes' Eyes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Barton, Sylvia S., RN, MScN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Northern British Columbia</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bartons@unbc.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To analyze critically the research literature relevant to diabetes mellitus in Canada's First Nations, with particular attention to epistemological and methodological frameworks, gaps, and silences. Organizing Construct: Coyote Stories. Naturalistic metaphors embedded in Aboriginal traditions, which represent a particular kind of knowledge, were viewed as integral to Aboriginal epistemology. Method: This integrative literature review includes an extensive search of published literature relevant to diabetes in Canada's First Nations between 1990 and 2002. Over 130 articles were initially identified, 102 could be categorized according to topics that focused on understanding diabetes as a progressing epidemic, and 42 articles were selected that represented a cross-section of topic areas. Findings: Studies were organized into categories of quantitative articles that included survey reports, clinical and prevalence studies, and community surveys related to the epidemiological characteristics and causes of diabetes in First Nations populations. Categories of qualitative articles included a focus on cultural beliefs, values, and meanings based on eliciting First Nations peoples' perspectives related to the experience of living with diabetes. Studies revealed research approaches that focused on frameworks uninformed by Aboriginal epistemology. Conclusions: Invaluable empirical diabetes research exists, but theoretically grounded studies in collaboration with Aboriginal people are imperative for the future. Inclusion of Aboriginal knowledge, expansion of associated cultural and contextual analyses, and experimentation with participatory research approaches would contribute to the development of culturally competent scholarship. Theory and research, as well as practice and policy implications are discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:19:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:19:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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