Women's Experiences Surrounding Childbirth in Rural Zambia: An Ethnographic Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150247
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women's Experiences Surrounding Childbirth in Rural Zambia: An Ethnographic Study
Abstract:
Women's Experiences Surrounding Childbirth in Rural Zambia: An Ethnographic Study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Brewer, Cynthia, N/A
P.I. Institution Name:Messiah College
Objective: Birth practices, the role of pregnant women, and the resulting health of both the women and their infants varies depending on cultural, spiritual and social differences around the world. This ethnography will seek to explain the cultural and spiritual beliefs and practices that impact pregnant women and their baby's health in rural Zambia. Design: This study will employ exploratory ethnographic research, which is focused on discovery and has as its product a hypothesis. This type of exploration is primarily characterized by participant observation. The investigator will observe and interview pregnant women who agree to take part in the study. On each weekly visit, the investigator will engage not only in interviewing but also in participant observation: active involvement as appropriate in household activities, childcare, meal preparation and chores. The investigator will also employ the use of physical assessment to gather data regarding health of the mother and baby, using the elements of the psychological, sociocultural, developmental and spiritual assessments as derived from the Neuman Systems Model. Population, Sample, Setting: The sample size will depend on the number of women who are pregnant during this time, and the number of these who are willing to participate. A goal of between 10 and 15 women is expected, wtih three months allotted for the study. The setting is rural Zambia, where the investigator will be living during the duration of the study. Concept or Variables Studied Together: The two theoretical frameworks utilized are Betty Neumans Systems Model and Madeline Leininger's Theory of Culture Care and Diversity. Findings, conclusions, and implications are yet to be found as this study will take place May-August 2003.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen's Experiences Surrounding Childbirth in Rural Zambia: An Ethnographic Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150247-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Women's Experiences Surrounding Childbirth in Rural Zambia: An Ethnographic Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brewer, Cynthia, N/A</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Messiah College</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cb1262@messiah.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Birth practices, the role of pregnant women, and the resulting health of both the women and their infants varies depending on cultural, spiritual and social differences around the world. This ethnography will seek to explain the cultural and spiritual beliefs and practices that impact pregnant women and their baby's health in rural Zambia. Design: This study will employ exploratory ethnographic research, which is focused on discovery and has as its product a hypothesis. This type of exploration is primarily characterized by participant observation. The investigator will observe and interview pregnant women who agree to take part in the study. On each weekly visit, the investigator will engage not only in interviewing but also in participant observation: active involvement as appropriate in household activities, childcare, meal preparation and chores. The investigator will also employ the use of physical assessment to gather data regarding health of the mother and baby, using the elements of the psychological, sociocultural, developmental and spiritual assessments as derived from the Neuman Systems Model. Population, Sample, Setting: The sample size will depend on the number of women who are pregnant during this time, and the number of these who are willing to participate. A goal of between 10 and 15 women is expected, wtih three months allotted for the study. The setting is rural Zambia, where the investigator will be living during the duration of the study. Concept or Variables Studied Together: The two theoretical frameworks utilized are Betty Neumans Systems Model and Madeline Leininger's Theory of Culture Care and Diversity. Findings, conclusions, and implications are yet to be found as this study will take place May-August 2003.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:19:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:19:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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