Quality of Life and Culture: Implications for Psychiatric Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150267
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Quality of Life and Culture: Implications for Psychiatric Nurses
Abstract:
Quality of Life and Culture: Implications for Psychiatric Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Clark, Beth, MSN, MEd, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Maine
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: To understand how the concept of quality of life guides the practice of psychiatric nurses who care for individuals with severe mental illness. Design: A grounded theory design was used to uncover the knowledge embedded in clinical practice. Sample: This study employed a purposive sample of twenty psychiatric nurses from all educational levels who were considered to be experts in their field. Methods: Nurses were surveyed using in-depth, face-to face interviews, followed by focus groups. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method, and open and axial coding. An audit trail, peer debriefing and member checks were employed to ensure credibility. Findings: Quality of life was seen as a concept imbued with cultural meanings. Nurses viewed cultural relativism as central to understanding a person’s concept of quality of life. Rather than using established rating scales, nurses preferred broad open-ended questions which allowed each individual to speak in his or her own voice. Quality of life was closely associated with the individual’s sense of self, life satisfaction, and goal attainment. Nurses came to understanding quality of life during times of dramatic contrast or when their own conceptualization was challenged. Conclusions: The health promotion, advocacy, education and supportive roles of the nurse were seen to be central to promoting quality of life. Nurses further assisted clients by working to reduce stigma, and helping them to see a broader range of choices in their lives. Stigma was viewed as a significant barrier to life quality which could be addressed through educational programs and the clinical supervision of paraprofessionals. Implications: Psychiatric nurses must be sensitive to the individual’s own definition of quality of life. Transcultural approaches are useful for nurses who wish to empower individuals with severe mental illness, and to help them achieve their own vision of quality of life.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQuality of Life and Culture: Implications for Psychiatric Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150267-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Quality of Life and Culture: Implications for Psychiatric Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Clark, Beth, MSN, MEd, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Maine</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">eclark@maine.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To understand how the concept of quality of life guides the practice of psychiatric nurses who care for individuals with severe mental illness. Design: A grounded theory design was used to uncover the knowledge embedded in clinical practice. Sample: This study employed a purposive sample of twenty psychiatric nurses from all educational levels who were considered to be experts in their field. Methods: Nurses were surveyed using in-depth, face-to face interviews, followed by focus groups. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method, and open and axial coding. An audit trail, peer debriefing and member checks were employed to ensure credibility. Findings: Quality of life was seen as a concept imbued with cultural meanings. Nurses viewed cultural relativism as central to understanding a person&rsquo;s concept of quality of life. Rather than using established rating scales, nurses preferred broad open-ended questions which allowed each individual to speak in his or her own voice. Quality of life was closely associated with the individual&rsquo;s sense of self, life satisfaction, and goal attainment. Nurses came to understanding quality of life during times of dramatic contrast or when their own conceptualization was challenged. Conclusions: The health promotion, advocacy, education and supportive roles of the nurse were seen to be central to promoting quality of life. Nurses further assisted clients by working to reduce stigma, and helping them to see a broader range of choices in their lives. Stigma was viewed as a significant barrier to life quality which could be addressed through educational programs and the clinical supervision of paraprofessionals. Implications: Psychiatric nurses must be sensitive to the individual&rsquo;s own definition of quality of life. Transcultural approaches are useful for nurses who wish to empower individuals with severe mental illness, and to help them achieve their own vision of quality of life.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:20:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:20:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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