Educating Tomorrow’s Nurses – Where Are Nursing Informatics? A National Canadian Nursing Informatics Education Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150268
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Educating Tomorrow’s Nurses – Where Are Nursing Informatics? A National Canadian Nursing Informatics Education Study
Abstract:
Educating Tomorrow’s Nurses – Where Are Nursing Informatics? A National Canadian Nursing Informatics Education Study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Clarke, Heather F., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Health & Nursing Policy, Research & Evaluation Consulting
Co-Authors:Lynn Nagle, BN, MScN, PhD
Objective: The purpose of our presentation is to describe major findings and recommendations of the national study on nursing informatics (NI) education in Canada and discuss dissemination and follow-up strategies. Rapid growth of information and communication technology solutions in health care has significant implications for nursing. We need to ensure that graduates have informatics competencies required to meet nursing practice standards and provide evidence-based care. Little is known how this requirement is met in Canada, nor where gaps, expertise and resources exist. A national study aimed to address this issue by describing 1) current NI content in undergraduate nursing programs, 2) availability of infrastructure and 3) faculty expertise and experience. The project’s goals were to develop recommendations to influence policy and decision makers. Design: Phase 1, fall 2002, employed three online questionnaires to survey all Canadian undergraduate nursing programs (n=77) and nursing faculty with NI responsibilities. Phase 2 uses referent discussion groups of nurse educators, clinicians, administrators and researchers to assist with interpretation of results, discuss implications and develop recommendations. Methods: Three online questionnaires (2 program based – Curriculum and Infrastructure; 1 faculty based) were administered via e-mail through the School of Nursing designated contact, with followed up using a modified Dillman approach. Referent discussion groups are planned during two major Canadian conferences and one metropolitan educator’s meeting. Findings: Response rates for the program questionnaires were 49% (n=38) curriculum and 48% (n=36) infrastructure. 130 faculty responded, representing 38% schools. The results indicate that faculty have more access to limited infrastructure than do students, curricula do not yet reflect the realities of nursing informatics requirements, and there are few faculty with nursing informatics expertise. Conclusions: Conclusions and policy implications will be discussed. Funded by Health Canada Office of Health and the Information Highway through the Canadian Nursing Informatics Association.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEducating Tomorrow’s Nurses – Where Are Nursing Informatics? A National Canadian Nursing Informatics Education Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150268-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Educating Tomorrow&rsquo;s Nurses &ndash; Where Are Nursing Informatics? A National Canadian Nursing Informatics Education Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Clarke, Heather F., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Health &amp; Nursing Policy, Research &amp; Evaluation Consulting</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">heather.clarke@shaw.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lynn Nagle, BN, MScN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of our presentation is to describe major findings and recommendations of the national study on nursing informatics (NI) education in Canada and discuss dissemination and follow-up strategies. Rapid growth of information and communication technology solutions in health care has significant implications for nursing. We need to ensure that graduates have informatics competencies required to meet nursing practice standards and provide evidence-based care. Little is known how this requirement is met in Canada, nor where gaps, expertise and resources exist. A national study aimed to address this issue by describing 1) current NI content in undergraduate nursing programs, 2) availability of infrastructure and 3) faculty expertise and experience. The project&rsquo;s goals were to develop recommendations to influence policy and decision makers. Design: Phase 1, fall 2002, employed three online questionnaires to survey all Canadian undergraduate nursing programs (n=77) and nursing faculty with NI responsibilities. Phase 2 uses referent discussion groups of nurse educators, clinicians, administrators and researchers to assist with interpretation of results, discuss implications and develop recommendations. Methods: Three online questionnaires (2 program based &ndash; Curriculum and Infrastructure; 1 faculty based) were administered via e-mail through the School of Nursing designated contact, with followed up using a modified Dillman approach. Referent discussion groups are planned during two major Canadian conferences and one metropolitan educator&rsquo;s meeting. Findings: Response rates for the program questionnaires were 49% (n=38) curriculum and 48% (n=36) infrastructure. 130 faculty responded, representing 38% schools. The results indicate that faculty have more access to limited infrastructure than do students, curricula do not yet reflect the realities of nursing informatics requirements, and there are few faculty with nursing informatics expertise. Conclusions: Conclusions and policy implications will be discussed. Funded by Health Canada Office of Health and the Information Highway through the Canadian Nursing Informatics Association.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:20:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:20:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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