2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150269
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cervical Cancer: Stories of Long-Term Survival
Abstract:
Cervical Cancer: Stories of Long-Term Survival
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Clemmens, Donna (Danuta), PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:New York University
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: The overall objective in conducting this study was to survey long-term cervical cancer survivors and describe their current quality of life, and the resources and strategies that promoted their adaptation. Design: A descriptive, qualitative design, congruent with this objective, was employed. Population, Sample, Setting: This study is part of a four site national investigation with this qualitative arm being unique to the Connecticut site cohort. Patients diagnosed with cervical cancer in the State of Connecticut between 1975 and 1995 were identified through the Connecticut Tumor Registry. Sampling was purposive and of the 200 patients who consented and completed the quantitative questionnaires, 20 were contacted for more in-depth interviews because of a reported variance in their quality of life. The open-ended interviews were conducted in person, or via telephone. Concepts Studied Together: The concepts of quality of life, and adaptation to cervical cancer were the focus of interest. Method: The interviews yielded descriptions of women’s experience with cervical cancer from diagnosis through treatment to their current life status. The techniques of narrative analysis were used to interpret the data. Findings: The plot line centered on the diagnosis of cervical cancer and the subsequent pathway to either acceptance or adaptation, or grieving and regrets. Major characters included patients, with family and health care professionals framed in both positive and negative tones, playing supportive roles. The goals for adaptation were realized through some unique strategies and solutions, underscoring women’s troubles and resilience in battling a sometimes difficult and challenging disease course. Conclusion: Women describe their stories in terms of both positive and negative experiences. Their pathways to grieving or adaptation are situated in their individual responses to the disease course. Implications: Nurses can educate patients regarding cervical cancer, encouraging them to be active participants in decisions and treatment plans surrounding their diagnosis.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCervical Cancer: Stories of Long-Term Survivalen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150269-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cervical Cancer: Stories of Long-Term Survival</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Clemmens, Donna (Danuta), PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">New York University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dcstamf@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The overall objective in conducting this study was to survey long-term cervical cancer survivors and describe their current quality of life, and the resources and strategies that promoted their adaptation. Design: A descriptive, qualitative design, congruent with this objective, was employed. Population, Sample, Setting: This study is part of a four site national investigation with this qualitative arm being unique to the Connecticut site cohort. Patients diagnosed with cervical cancer in the State of Connecticut between 1975 and 1995 were identified through the Connecticut Tumor Registry. Sampling was purposive and of the 200 patients who consented and completed the quantitative questionnaires, 20 were contacted for more in-depth interviews because of a reported variance in their quality of life. The open-ended interviews were conducted in person, or via telephone. Concepts Studied Together: The concepts of quality of life, and adaptation to cervical cancer were the focus of interest. Method: The interviews yielded descriptions of women&rsquo;s experience with cervical cancer from diagnosis through treatment to their current life status. The techniques of narrative analysis were used to interpret the data. Findings: The plot line centered on the diagnosis of cervical cancer and the subsequent pathway to either acceptance or adaptation, or grieving and regrets. Major characters included patients, with family and health care professionals framed in both positive and negative tones, playing supportive roles. The goals for adaptation were realized through some unique strategies and solutions, underscoring women&rsquo;s troubles and resilience in battling a sometimes difficult and challenging disease course. Conclusion: Women describe their stories in terms of both positive and negative experiences. Their pathways to grieving or adaptation are situated in their individual responses to the disease course. Implications: Nurses can educate patients regarding cervical cancer, encouraging them to be active participants in decisions and treatment plans surrounding their diagnosis.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:20:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:20:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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