Interpersonal Bridges in Mental Health: An Ethnographic Analysis of Peer and Nursing Support

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150272
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Interpersonal Bridges in Mental Health: An Ethnographic Analysis of Peer and Nursing Support
Abstract:
Interpersonal Bridges in Mental Health: An Ethnographic Analysis of Peer and Nursing Support
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Coatsworth-Puspoky, Robin, RN, MScN
P.I. Institution Name:Regional Mental Health Care, London
Title:Research Assistant
In mental health, peer support was identified as a valuable resource (Davidson, 1999; Davidson et al., 1999; Davidson & Strauss, 1992; Forchuk, Jewell, et al., 1998; Tooth et al., 1997; William & Collins, 1999). The nurse-client relationship has been identified as the essential instrument in mental health nursing (Lego, 1980; Peplau. 1992). However, research related to the recipient’s perspective in peer and nursing support relationships is limited. An ethnographic method (Leininger, 1985, 1990) was used to describe and explore supportive mental health relationships. Informants from two consumer- run organizations volunteered to share their peer and nursing support experiences. Experiential knowledge related to mental illness differentiated peer and nursing support. Peer and nursing support relationships developed or deteriorated through three overlapping phases. Therapeutic relationships generally had a positive impact on recipients’ perceptions of stress, coping, and mental heath. The opposite occurred in tenuous relationships. These findings suggest both types of relationships are unique; important to facilitate consumers’ recovery and promote mental health, and should be recognized and promoted by professionals and the mental health care system.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInterpersonal Bridges in Mental Health: An Ethnographic Analysis of Peer and Nursing Supporten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150272-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Interpersonal Bridges in Mental Health: An Ethnographic Analysis of Peer and Nursing Support</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Coatsworth-Puspoky, Robin, RN, MScN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Regional Mental Health Care, London</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Assistant</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rcoatsw2@execulink.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In mental health, peer support was identified as a valuable resource (Davidson, 1999; Davidson et al., 1999; Davidson &amp; Strauss, 1992; Forchuk, Jewell, et al., 1998; Tooth et al., 1997; William &amp; Collins, 1999). The nurse-client relationship has been identified as the essential instrument in mental health nursing (Lego, 1980; Peplau. 1992). However, research related to the recipient&rsquo;s perspective in peer and nursing support relationships is limited. An ethnographic method (Leininger, 1985, 1990) was used to describe and explore supportive mental health relationships. Informants from two consumer- run organizations volunteered to share their peer and nursing support experiences. Experiential knowledge related to mental illness differentiated peer and nursing support. Peer and nursing support relationships developed or deteriorated through three overlapping phases. Therapeutic relationships generally had a positive impact on recipients&rsquo; perceptions of stress, coping, and mental heath. The opposite occurred in tenuous relationships. These findings suggest both types of relationships are unique; important to facilitate consumers&rsquo; recovery and promote mental health, and should be recognized and promoted by professionals and the mental health care system.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:20:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:20:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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