Translating Science into Practice: An Historical Analysis of Nurses and the "Pretubercular" Child, 1900-1940

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150273
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Translating Science into Practice: An Historical Analysis of Nurses and the "Pretubercular" Child, 1900-1940
Abstract:
Translating Science into Practice: An Historical Analysis of Nurses and the "Pretubercular" Child, 1900-1940
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Connolly, Cynthia, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Columbia University School of Public Health
Title:Postdoctoral Fellow
Purpose: Tuberculosis was a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in early twentieth century America. This paper analyzes the way in which nurses interpreted research related to pediatric 'pretuberculosis' and how they used this information in practice. Methods and Sources: Social history methodology was used. Primary sources included archival materials from New York City's Municipal Archives, Bellevue Hospital, Columbia University, New York Hospital and the New York Academy of Medicine. Results and Conclusions: The early twentieth century was a frustrating time in the campaign against TB. The disease's etiology and transmission were increasingly well understood but there were few effective treatments. As a result, prevention was the centerpiece of most TB public health campaigns. The 1907 finding that many children harbored the tuberculosis (TB) bacillus shocked the scientific community and stimulated ia series of TB prevention interventions. Nurses were at the forefront of numerous initiatives predicated on the newly constructed disease category of 'pretuberculosis.' Implications: Explicating the rise and fall of 'pretuberculosis' provides a new perspective, that of time, into the social and cultural variables that influence research, as well as the way in which scientific findings are translated into practice. This knowledge can be used to develop more sophisticated frames of reference to study the links between science, policy, and practice. Studying the past can also reveal new dimensions into the way in which society conceptualizes disease risk and prevention. As in the early twentieth century, children are again at the center of many current hotly contested health and social welfare debates. Finally, preventing infectious disease is a priority now, at the beginning of the twenty-first century, as it was at the beginning of the twentieth. Studying what worked in the past, what did not, and why has the potential to enrich nursing care today and in the future.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTranslating Science into Practice: An Historical Analysis of Nurses and the "Pretubercular" Child, 1900-1940en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150273-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Translating Science into Practice: An Historical Analysis of Nurses and the &quot;Pretubercular&quot; Child, 1900-1940</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Connolly, Cynthia, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Columbia University School of Public Health</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Postdoctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cindy.connolly@yale.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Tuberculosis was a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in early twentieth century America. This paper analyzes the way in which nurses interpreted research related to pediatric 'pretuberculosis' and how they used this information in practice. Methods and Sources: Social history methodology was used. Primary sources included archival materials from New York City's Municipal Archives, Bellevue Hospital, Columbia University, New York Hospital and the New York Academy of Medicine. Results and Conclusions: The early twentieth century was a frustrating time in the campaign against TB. The disease's etiology and transmission were increasingly well understood but there were few effective treatments. As a result, prevention was the centerpiece of most TB public health campaigns. The 1907 finding that many children harbored the tuberculosis (TB) bacillus shocked the scientific community and stimulated ia series of TB prevention interventions. Nurses were at the forefront of numerous initiatives predicated on the newly constructed disease category of 'pretuberculosis.' Implications: Explicating the rise and fall of 'pretuberculosis' provides a new perspective, that of time, into the social and cultural variables that influence research, as well as the way in which scientific findings are translated into practice. This knowledge can be used to develop more sophisticated frames of reference to study the links between science, policy, and practice. Studying the past can also reveal new dimensions into the way in which society conceptualizes disease risk and prevention. As in the early twentieth century, children are again at the center of many current hotly contested health and social welfare debates. Finally, preventing infectious disease is a priority now, at the beginning of the twenty-first century, as it was at the beginning of the twentieth. Studying what worked in the past, what did not, and why has the potential to enrich nursing care today and in the future.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:20:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:20:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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