Multilevel Analysis of Nursing-Related, Hospital-Level Factors on Patient Outcome in Alberta Acute Hospitals

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150295
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Multilevel Analysis of Nursing-Related, Hospital-Level Factors on Patient Outcome in Alberta Acute Hospitals
Abstract:
Multilevel Analysis of Nursing-Related, Hospital-Level Factors on Patient Outcome in Alberta Acute Hospitals
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Estabrooks, Carole A., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Alberta
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:William Kai Midodzi, BSc, MSc, MSc; Greta G. Cummings, RN, MEd; Charles Humphrey, MA; Kathryn L. Ricker, BKin, MSc; Phyllis Giovannetti, RN, ScD
Objective: To determine the relative effect of nursing derived hospital factors on patient mortality, after accounting for differences in patient and hospital characteristics. Sample: Patient sample included all 23,873 adult inpatients in Alberta hospitals with a diagnosis of AMI, CHF, COPD, stroke or pneumonia, during the 1997-98 fiscal year. The hospital sample was derived from the Alberta Nurse Survey (1998). All nurses in acute care hospitals were accessed through the professional association (n=6526, 52.8% response rate). Fifty hospitals with more than 5 respondents and greater than 20 beds were identified and matched to the patient sample. Variables: Demographic, nurse outcome, inpatient mortality (or the vital status of the patient within 30 days of admission), organizational and practice environment variables were averaged at the hospital level to reflect nursing characteristics of each hospital. Methods: To control for variation in the patient mix in hospitals, patient level logistic regression was used to develop risk-adjusted scores. These scores adjusted for patients that develop complications based on demographics, pre-existing conditions and co-morbidities. Multilevel logistic regression was used with patients nested in hospitals. This partitioned the variance of adjusted inpatient mortality into patient and hospital levels. The relative effects of nursing derived hospital characteristics were calculated unadjusted and adjusted for specific patient and hospital characteristics. Findings: Significant variation in patient mortality exists across hospitals (variance =0.083, p<0.0001). Patient age, sex, pre-existing conditions and co-morbidities were strong determinants, (67% variance across hospitals). Hospital factors explained 11%, leaving 22% to be explained by nursing and unknown factors. Conclusions: Results suggest significant variations in patient mortality largely attributable to differences in patient characteristics and pre-existing conditions. Organizational and nursing related factors (e.g., non-nursing tasks, quality of care) contribute to variation in patient mortality. Implications: Hospital factors, nurse and support staff levels have a demonstrable impact on patient mortality.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMultilevel Analysis of Nursing-Related, Hospital-Level Factors on Patient Outcome in Alberta Acute Hospitalsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150295-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Multilevel Analysis of Nursing-Related, Hospital-Level Factors on Patient Outcome in Alberta Acute Hospitals</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Estabrooks, Carole A., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Alberta</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">carole.estabrooks@ualberta.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">William Kai Midodzi, BSc, MSc, MSc; Greta G. Cummings, RN, MEd; Charles Humphrey, MA; Kathryn L. Ricker, BKin, MSc; Phyllis Giovannetti, RN, ScD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To determine the relative effect of nursing derived hospital factors on patient mortality, after accounting for differences in patient and hospital characteristics. Sample: Patient sample included all 23,873 adult inpatients in Alberta hospitals with a diagnosis of AMI, CHF, COPD, stroke or pneumonia, during the 1997-98 fiscal year. The hospital sample was derived from the Alberta Nurse Survey (1998). All nurses in acute care hospitals were accessed through the professional association (n=6526, 52.8% response rate). Fifty hospitals with more than 5 respondents and greater than 20 beds were identified and matched to the patient sample. Variables: Demographic, nurse outcome, inpatient mortality (or the vital status of the patient within 30 days of admission), organizational and practice environment variables were averaged at the hospital level to reflect nursing characteristics of each hospital. Methods: To control for variation in the patient mix in hospitals, patient level logistic regression was used to develop risk-adjusted scores. These scores adjusted for patients that develop complications based on demographics, pre-existing conditions and co-morbidities. Multilevel logistic regression was used with patients nested in hospitals. This partitioned the variance of adjusted inpatient mortality into patient and hospital levels. The relative effects of nursing derived hospital characteristics were calculated unadjusted and adjusted for specific patient and hospital characteristics. Findings: Significant variation in patient mortality exists across hospitals (variance =0.083, p&lt;0.0001). Patient age, sex, pre-existing conditions and co-morbidities were strong determinants, (67% variance across hospitals). Hospital factors explained 11%, leaving 22% to be explained by nursing and unknown factors. Conclusions: Results suggest significant variations in patient mortality largely attributable to differences in patient characteristics and pre-existing conditions. Organizational and nursing related factors (e.g., non-nursing tasks, quality of care) contribute to variation in patient mortality. Implications: Hospital factors, nurse and support staff levels have a demonstrable impact on patient mortality.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:21:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:21:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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