A Historical Review of the Perceptions of Spirituality and Religion within Alcoholics Anonymous

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150297
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Historical Review of the Perceptions of Spirituality and Religion within Alcoholics Anonymous
Abstract:
A Historical Review of the Perceptions of Spirituality and Religion within Alcoholics Anonymous
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Feigenbaum, Janice Cooke, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University at Buffalo
Title:Clinical Professor
Objective: This historical research aimed to develop an accurate perception of the role of spirituality and religion within the history of Alcoholics Anonymous. Concepts Studied: This historical research was based on King’s (1997) belief in the importance of nurses clarifying their own perceptions of phenomenon as a basis for interacting with their clients. Nurses can motivate individuals, who are dependent on a substance, to attend 12 step, self-help support groups. However, this role involves much more than making a referral, and includes discussing the program’s philosophical beliefs. Method: Primary sources, including Alcoholic Anonymous books and William James’ (1901-1902) writings, and secondary sources, such as histories of this organization, were analyzed to clarify how the founders and leaders of Alcoholics Anonymous characterized the role of religion and spirituality within this program. Findings: The review demonstrated that the founders and leaders specifically separated religion and spirituality by viewing religion as a form of worship and spirituality as a person’s belief in some phenomenon greater than oneself (Early Step Guide, undated, p. 10). Conclusions: This historical research delineated the emphasis on spirituality, not religion, within Alcoholics Anonymous. Implications: Approximately 20 to 50 percent of patients in all health care settings may be dependent on nicotine, alcohol, and/or other legal or illicit substances (Feigenbaum & Allen, 1996). Successfully recovering from an addiction is facilitated by regularly attending meetings of 12 step support programs (Craig, Krishna, & Poniarski, 1997). Persons frequently avoid these programs because they perceive them to be related to a religion. Additionally, nurses hold similar perceptions and are hesitant to discuss these programs with their clients (Miller, 1998). Nurses need to develop accurate perceptions (King, 1981) of the primary focus of spirituality, not religion, within these programs so they can clarify individuals’ perceptions of this treatment being overly religious.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Historical Review of the Perceptions of Spirituality and Religion within Alcoholics Anonymousen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150297-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Historical Review of the Perceptions of Spirituality and Religion within Alcoholics Anonymous</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Feigenbaum, Janice Cooke, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University at Buffalo</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jcf6@buffalo.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: This historical research aimed to develop an accurate perception of the role of spirituality and religion within the history of Alcoholics Anonymous. Concepts Studied: This historical research was based on King&rsquo;s (1997) belief in the importance of nurses clarifying their own perceptions of phenomenon as a basis for interacting with their clients. Nurses can motivate individuals, who are dependent on a substance, to attend 12 step, self-help support groups. However, this role involves much more than making a referral, and includes discussing the program&rsquo;s philosophical beliefs. Method: Primary sources, including Alcoholic Anonymous books and William James&rsquo; (1901-1902) writings, and secondary sources, such as histories of this organization, were analyzed to clarify how the founders and leaders of Alcoholics Anonymous characterized the role of religion and spirituality within this program. Findings: The review demonstrated that the founders and leaders specifically separated religion and spirituality by viewing religion as a form of worship and spirituality as a person&rsquo;s belief in some phenomenon greater than oneself (Early Step Guide, undated, p. 10). Conclusions: This historical research delineated the emphasis on spirituality, not religion, within Alcoholics Anonymous. Implications: Approximately 20 to 50 percent of patients in all health care settings may be dependent on nicotine, alcohol, and/or other legal or illicit substances (Feigenbaum &amp; Allen, 1996). Successfully recovering from an addiction is facilitated by regularly attending meetings of 12 step support programs (Craig, Krishna, &amp; Poniarski, 1997). Persons frequently avoid these programs because they perceive them to be related to a religion. Additionally, nurses hold similar perceptions and are hesitant to discuss these programs with their clients (Miller, 1998). Nurses need to develop accurate perceptions (King, 1981) of the primary focus of spirituality, not religion, within these programs so they can clarify individuals&rsquo; perceptions of this treatment being overly religious.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:21:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:21:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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