Promoting Physical Activity in African-American Churches: An Intervention Model for Sustainable Health Promotion

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150300
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Promoting Physical Activity in African-American Churches: An Intervention Model for Sustainable Health Promotion
Abstract:
Promoting Physical Activity in African-American Churches: An Intervention Model for Sustainable Health Promotion
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Fleury, Julie Derenowski, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:Hanner Professor
Objective: African Americans have higher than average rates for several chronic illnesses and lower than average rates for participation in physical activity. However, understanding of socially and culturally relevant interventions to promote physical activity among underserved, rural African American communities is inadequate. This research outlines the design and implementation of a theory-based intervention conducted in partnership with African American churches, to foster sustainability of health promotion efforts. Design: A participatory research approach was used to identify social and contextual processes and resources for sustainable interventions to promote physical activity. Sample/Setting: Seventy-six African American community stakeholders in rural North Carolina (mean age 55.5, 78% female, 57.8% married, mean schooling years = 11.3). Methods: Participatory ethnography conducted in addition to participant observation and informal communication with church leadership. Constant comparative analysis was used throughout data collection and analysis. Open coding was used to label and contrast data with attention to consistency and variance. Techniques used to insure trustworthiness of data were consistent with naturalistic inquiry. Findings: Data explicated the strengths, resources and social networks of the church community, and supported a social ecological and motivational framework for intervention design. Ethnographic data was interpreted consistent with the theoretical framework to form a multilevel intervention with components addressing individual, social network, organizational, and community levels. Conclusions: Interventions were designed with attention to cultural relevance, sustainability within the church setting, and the potential for dissemination to the community. Components of the intervention included the African American church in leadership development, lay advisor support networks, empowering education and motivational strategies. Implications: Intervention design and implementation was guided by community members and church partners, and built on community strengths to create sustainable health promotion efforts. Experiences in this community may provide insights into promoting physical activity and narrowing differences in the health status of underserved, minority communities.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePromoting Physical Activity in African-American Churches: An Intervention Model for Sustainable Health Promotionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150300-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Promoting Physical Activity in African-American Churches: An Intervention Model for Sustainable Health Promotion</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fleury, Julie Derenowski, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Hanner Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Julie.Fleury@asu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: African Americans have higher than average rates for several chronic illnesses and lower than average rates for participation in physical activity. However, understanding of socially and culturally relevant interventions to promote physical activity among underserved, rural African American communities is inadequate. This research outlines the design and implementation of a theory-based intervention conducted in partnership with African American churches, to foster sustainability of health promotion efforts. Design: A participatory research approach was used to identify social and contextual processes and resources for sustainable interventions to promote physical activity. Sample/Setting: Seventy-six African American community stakeholders in rural North Carolina (mean age 55.5, 78% female, 57.8% married, mean schooling years = 11.3). Methods: Participatory ethnography conducted in addition to participant observation and informal communication with church leadership. Constant comparative analysis was used throughout data collection and analysis. Open coding was used to label and contrast data with attention to consistency and variance. Techniques used to insure trustworthiness of data were consistent with naturalistic inquiry. Findings: Data explicated the strengths, resources and social networks of the church community, and supported a social ecological and motivational framework for intervention design. Ethnographic data was interpreted consistent with the theoretical framework to form a multilevel intervention with components addressing individual, social network, organizational, and community levels. Conclusions: Interventions were designed with attention to cultural relevance, sustainability within the church setting, and the potential for dissemination to the community. Components of the intervention included the African American church in leadership development, lay advisor support networks, empowering education and motivational strategies. Implications: Intervention design and implementation was guided by community members and church partners, and built on community strengths to create sustainable health promotion efforts. Experiences in this community may provide insights into promoting physical activity and narrowing differences in the health status of underserved, minority communities.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:21:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:21:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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