2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150302
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nutritional Adequacy in Low-Income Pregnant Women
Abstract:
Nutritional Adequacy in Low-Income Pregnant Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Fowles, Eileen R., PhD, RNC
P.I. Institution Name:Illinois State University
Title:Associate Professor
Objective: The purpose of this project was apply Pender's Health Promotion Model (1986), to describe the relationship of low-income pregnant women's prior health behavior, perceived benefits and self-efficacy to nutritional adequacy in the first trimester of pregnancy. Design: Descriptive, correlational Sample/Setting: Participants included low-income, pregnant women ( N = 69) in their first trimester of pregnancy, who receive food supplementation coupons through a WIC clinic. Average age of the women was 24 years, most were Caucasian, unmarried, in their first or second pregnancy, with an income of Methods: This study utilized a demographic questionnaire, the Prenatal Health Questionnaire to assess prior health-related behaviors; the Perceived Health Competency Scale to assess perceived self-efficacy; the Maternal Nutritional Knowledge to measure knowledge of nutrition (perceived benefits); and the Fetal Health Locus of Control Scale to assess feelings of self-efficacy over fetal health. Nutritional adequacy was assessed using the Dietary Score, which was based on a 24-hour dietary recall. Findings: Many women did not eat the recommended number servings of meat (45%), milk (55%), vegetables (62%), fruits (65%), or bread (52%) nor did their dietary intake meet the nutritional requirements of pregnancy. Healthy prior behaviors toward nutrition were positively related nutritional adequacy. African-American and Asian women ate significantly more fruit. Smokers had an increased milk intake and overall dietary score but lower health-related behaviors. No relationship was noted between dietary adequacy and other health promotion-specific variables. Perceived health competency scores were positively related to internal locus of control toward fetal health and negatively related to locus of control attributed to chance or powerful others. Conclusions/Implications: This study suggests that further research is needed to identify factors that influence healthy eating behaviors in pregnancy, to examine their influence on birth outcomes and to develop effective interventions that enhance nutrition in low-income pregnant women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNutritional Adequacy in Low-Income Pregnant Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150302-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nutritional Adequacy in Low-Income Pregnant Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fowles, Eileen R., PhD, RNC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Illinois State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">erfowle@ilstu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this project was apply Pender's Health Promotion Model (1986), to describe the relationship of low-income pregnant women's prior health behavior, perceived benefits and self-efficacy to nutritional adequacy in the first trimester of pregnancy. Design: Descriptive, correlational Sample/Setting: Participants included low-income, pregnant women ( N = 69) in their first trimester of pregnancy, who receive food supplementation coupons through a WIC clinic. Average age of the women was 24 years, most were Caucasian, unmarried, in their first or second pregnancy, with an income of Methods: This study utilized a demographic questionnaire, the Prenatal Health Questionnaire to assess prior health-related behaviors; the Perceived Health Competency Scale to assess perceived self-efficacy; the Maternal Nutritional Knowledge to measure knowledge of nutrition (perceived benefits); and the Fetal Health Locus of Control Scale to assess feelings of self-efficacy over fetal health. Nutritional adequacy was assessed using the Dietary Score, which was based on a 24-hour dietary recall. Findings: Many women did not eat the recommended number servings of meat (45%), milk (55%), vegetables (62%), fruits (65%), or bread (52%) nor did their dietary intake meet the nutritional requirements of pregnancy. Healthy prior behaviors toward nutrition were positively related nutritional adequacy. African-American and Asian women ate significantly more fruit. Smokers had an increased milk intake and overall dietary score but lower health-related behaviors. No relationship was noted between dietary adequacy and other health promotion-specific variables. Perceived health competency scores were positively related to internal locus of control toward fetal health and negatively related to locus of control attributed to chance or powerful others. Conclusions/Implications: This study suggests that further research is needed to identify factors that influence healthy eating behaviors in pregnancy, to examine their influence on birth outcomes and to develop effective interventions that enhance nutrition in low-income pregnant women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:21:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:21:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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