2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150303
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Rural Women Living With Fibromyalgia: A Phenomenological Study
Abstract:
Rural Women Living With Fibromyalgia: A Phenomenological Study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:France, Nancey E.M., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Murray State University
Title:Coordinator: Master of Science in Nursing Program
Co-Authors:Barbara Kearney, PhD, RN
Objective: The phenomenon of interest was to explore the experience of rural women living with fibromyalgia (FMS). Design: A triangulated phenomenological design was conducted using van Manen’s methodology. Population, Sample, Setting: The sample consisted of women with FMS who lived in rural areas of a southern state. Data were collected in facilities where FMS support group meetings were regularly held and as preferred by the participants. Methods: A seven-member research team conducted individual interviews (n=41), focus groups (n=4 groups at 10-12 participants each), and observations of FMS support group meetings (n=2 at 20-40 participants each) in different regions of a southern state. Questions asked during the participant interviews were: What’s it like to live with FMS? What works for you? What does not work for you? The purpose of the focus group interviews was to explore with the participants what they needed from the health care system. Observation of the support group meetings focused on social interaction, dialogue, networking, emotion, mutual caring and support within the group. Findings: From repeating/enduring patterns, five themes and a synthesis of unity emerged. The themes that emerged from ‘what is it like?’: “I keep losing the battle.”; “I’ve lost myself.”; “Nobody believes me.”; Suffering; and from ‘what do you need from the health care system?’ “Primum non nocere” (do no harm). The Synthesis of Unity was “Life is a struggle everyday mentally, physically, emotionally and that’s the way we live.” Conclusions: The study’s participants verify that health care providers are not comfortable with diagnosing and treating FMS. In sharing what works for them, these women described complementary healing modalities; whereas, what does not work for them they clearly stated “medicine…and medication.” Implications: Implications support caring as the essence of nursing. An intervention study is being designed to examine treatment modalities (as defined by participants).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRural Women Living With Fibromyalgia: A Phenomenological Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150303-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Rural Women Living With Fibromyalgia: A Phenomenological Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">France, Nancey E.M., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Murray State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Coordinator: Master of Science in Nursing Program</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nancey.france@murraystate.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Barbara Kearney, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The phenomenon of interest was to explore the experience of rural women living with fibromyalgia (FMS). Design: A triangulated phenomenological design was conducted using van Manen&rsquo;s methodology. Population, Sample, Setting: The sample consisted of women with FMS who lived in rural areas of a southern state. Data were collected in facilities where FMS support group meetings were regularly held and as preferred by the participants. Methods: A seven-member research team conducted individual interviews (n=41), focus groups (n=4 groups at 10-12 participants each), and observations of FMS support group meetings (n=2 at 20-40 participants each) in different regions of a southern state. Questions asked during the participant interviews were: What&rsquo;s it like to live with FMS? What works for you? What does not work for you? The purpose of the focus group interviews was to explore with the participants what they needed from the health care system. Observation of the support group meetings focused on social interaction, dialogue, networking, emotion, mutual caring and support within the group. Findings: From repeating/enduring patterns, five themes and a synthesis of unity emerged. The themes that emerged from &lsquo;what is it like?&rsquo;: &ldquo;I keep losing the battle.&rdquo;; &ldquo;I&rsquo;ve lost myself.&rdquo;; &ldquo;Nobody believes me.&rdquo;; Suffering; and from &lsquo;what do you need from the health care system?&rsquo; &ldquo;Primum non nocere&rdquo; (do no harm). The Synthesis of Unity was &ldquo;Life is a struggle everyday mentally, physically, emotionally and that&rsquo;s the way we live.&rdquo; Conclusions: The study&rsquo;s participants verify that health care providers are not comfortable with diagnosing and treating FMS. In sharing what works for them, these women described complementary healing modalities; whereas, what does not work for them they clearly stated &ldquo;medicine&hellip;and medication.&rdquo; Implications: Implications support caring as the essence of nursing. An intervention study is being designed to examine treatment modalities (as defined by participants).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:21:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:21:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.