2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150316
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Characteristics of the U.S. Nurse Practitioner Workforce
Abstract:
Characteristics of the U.S. Nurse Practitioner Workforce
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Goolsby, Mary Jo, EdD, MSN, APRN-C, FAANP
P.I. Institution Name:American Academy of Nurse Practitioners
Title:Director of Research and Education
Co-Authors:Judith S. Dempster, DNSc, FNP-C, FAANP
Objective The objective was to describe the U. S. nurse practitioner (NP) workforce/population. NPs make up a large portion of advanced practice nurses. They provide primary and specialty care in varied settings. In addition to direct care, NPs perform other advanced practice roles including educator, administrator, and researcher. Design/Population/Methodology Since its creation in 1985, the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners (AANP) has maintained a national database of NPs. The database serves three major purposes: a) enumeration of the growing body of NPs, b) professional communication, and c) NP-related research. The comprehensive database includes essentially the “universe” of NPs recognized in the U.S. When updated in 2001, the database included approximately 82,000 NPs. In late 2001 and early 2002, AANP surveyed all NPs with current addresses (n=71,000), using a mailed survey designed to obtain information on practice site, specialty, practice roles, provision of primary care, years as an NP, hours worked, and demographics. With 39,015 responses (56%), this survey is the largest review of NP practice to date. The 2001-2002 data were compared with data from earlier AANP surveys. Findings The average NP respondent is female, 47 years old, a family NP, and has practiced as a NP for 8.6 years. Although a growing number of NPs work in specialty, acute, and long-term care, the majority still practice in primary care. This presentation will provide details on the current NPs: their practice, and how NP practice has changed over the past 13 years. Implications This presentation has implications for educators, advanced practice nurses, administrators, researchers, and nurses interested in the NP role. Issues related to the development and maintenance of a national professional database will be addressed, as well as a discussion of the future use of this resource for research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCharacteristics of the U.S. Nurse Practitioner Workforceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150316-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Characteristics of the U.S. Nurse Practitioner Workforce</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Goolsby, Mary Jo, EdD, MSN, APRN-C, FAANP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">American Academy of Nurse Practitioners</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director of Research and Education</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mjgoolsby@aanp.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Judith S. Dempster, DNSc, FNP-C, FAANP</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective The objective was to describe the U. S. nurse practitioner (NP) workforce/population. NPs make up a large portion of advanced practice nurses. They provide primary and specialty care in varied settings. In addition to direct care, NPs perform other advanced practice roles including educator, administrator, and researcher. Design/Population/Methodology Since its creation in 1985, the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners (AANP) has maintained a national database of NPs. The database serves three major purposes: a) enumeration of the growing body of NPs, b) professional communication, and c) NP-related research. The comprehensive database includes essentially the &ldquo;universe&rdquo; of NPs recognized in the U.S. When updated in 2001, the database included approximately 82,000 NPs. In late 2001 and early 2002, AANP surveyed all NPs with current addresses (n=71,000), using a mailed survey designed to obtain information on practice site, specialty, practice roles, provision of primary care, years as an NP, hours worked, and demographics. With 39,015 responses (56%), this survey is the largest review of NP practice to date. The 2001-2002 data were compared with data from earlier AANP surveys. Findings The average NP respondent is female, 47 years old, a family NP, and has practiced as a NP for 8.6 years. Although a growing number of NPs work in specialty, acute, and long-term care, the majority still practice in primary care. This presentation will provide details on the current NPs: their practice, and how NP practice has changed over the past 13 years. Implications This presentation has implications for educators, advanced practice nurses, administrators, researchers, and nurses interested in the NP role. Issues related to the development and maintenance of a national professional database will be addressed, as well as a discussion of the future use of this resource for research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:21:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:21:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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