The effects of imagery abilities and various combinations of mental rehearsal and physical practice on learning a novel, psychomotor nursing skill

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150319
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The effects of imagery abilities and various combinations of mental rehearsal and physical practice on learning a novel, psychomotor nursing skill
Abstract:
The effects of imagery abilities and various combinations of mental rehearsal and physical practice on learning a novel, psychomotor nursing skill
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Bucher, Linda, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Delaware
Title:Assistant Professor
Nursing, as a practice profession, demands competency in numerous

psychomotor skills related to patient care. Educators have the

responsibility for providing experiences that will prepare students

for their future roles. Using theory from Paivio, Anderson, and

Bandura to form the supportive framework, this attribute-treatment

study explored the interactive effects of imagery skills and various

combinations of physical and mental practice on learning a novel,

psychomotor nursing skill.



330 nursing students from 7 universities were assessed for levels

of imagery vividness and control. Through randomization, they

were assigned to a physical practice only, a mental rehearsal

only, or a combined mental rehearsal plus physical practice group.

After learning to apply and remove sterile gloves, subjects

were evaluated on their performance of the skill.



It was predicted that subjects possessing high imagery abilities

would perform the criterion skill better. It was also predicted

that subjects would benefit more from the mental rehearsal plus

physical practice condition. It was further hypothesized that

there would be a significant interaction between imagery vividness

and imagery control with the effect of high imagery control being

more pronounced for subjects with high imagery vividness when

learning the criterion skill. Two-way interactions were predicted

such that subjects with high imagery abilities in the mental

rehearsal plus physical practice condition would perform better.

The predicted three-way interaction stated that learning of the

criterion skill would be most pronounced for subjects high on

imagery vividness and high on imagery control in the mental

rehearsal plus physical practice condition and in the mental

rehearsal only condition.



A 3-Factor ANOVA was performed and a significant main effect for

practice condition was obtained (p<.05). Subjects in the mental

rehearsal plus physical practice condition performed significantly

better than subjects in the mental rehearsal only condition but not

the physical practice only condition. No other hypotheses were

supported. These findings have important implications for

educators who teach nursing skills. Incorporating the use of

mental rehearsal as an adjunct to physical practice in an effort to

facilitate skill acquisition was found to be beneficial.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe effects of imagery abilities and various combinations of mental rehearsal and physical practice on learning a novel, psychomotor nursing skillen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150319-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The effects of imagery abilities and various combinations of mental rehearsal and physical practice on learning a novel, psychomotor nursing skill</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bucher, Linda, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Delaware</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lbucher@udel.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nursing, as a practice profession, demands competency in numerous<br/><br/>psychomotor skills related to patient care. Educators have the<br/><br/>responsibility for providing experiences that will prepare students<br/><br/>for their future roles. Using theory from Paivio, Anderson, and<br/><br/>Bandura to form the supportive framework, this attribute-treatment<br/><br/>study explored the interactive effects of imagery skills and various<br/><br/>combinations of physical and mental practice on learning a novel,<br/><br/>psychomotor nursing skill.<br/><br/><br/><br/>330 nursing students from 7 universities were assessed for levels<br/><br/>of imagery vividness and control. Through randomization, they<br/><br/>were assigned to a physical practice only, a mental rehearsal<br/><br/>only, or a combined mental rehearsal plus physical practice group.<br/><br/>After learning to apply and remove sterile gloves, subjects<br/><br/>were evaluated on their performance of the skill.<br/><br/><br/><br/>It was predicted that subjects possessing high imagery abilities<br/><br/>would perform the criterion skill better. It was also predicted<br/><br/>that subjects would benefit more from the mental rehearsal plus<br/><br/>physical practice condition. It was further hypothesized that<br/><br/>there would be a significant interaction between imagery vividness<br/><br/>and imagery control with the effect of high imagery control being<br/><br/>more pronounced for subjects with high imagery vividness when<br/><br/>learning the criterion skill. Two-way interactions were predicted<br/><br/>such that subjects with high imagery abilities in the mental<br/><br/>rehearsal plus physical practice condition would perform better.<br/><br/>The predicted three-way interaction stated that learning of the<br/><br/>criterion skill would be most pronounced for subjects high on<br/><br/>imagery vividness and high on imagery control in the mental<br/><br/>rehearsal plus physical practice condition and in the mental<br/><br/>rehearsal only condition.<br/><br/><br/><br/>A 3-Factor ANOVA was performed and a significant main effect for<br/><br/>practice condition was obtained (p&lt;.05). Subjects in the mental<br/><br/>rehearsal plus physical practice condition performed significantly<br/><br/>better than subjects in the mental rehearsal only condition but not<br/><br/>the physical practice only condition. No other hypotheses were<br/><br/>supported. These findings have important implications for<br/><br/>educators who teach nursing skills. Incorporating the use of<br/><br/>mental rehearsal as an adjunct to physical practice in an effort to<br/><br/>facilitate skill acquisition was found to be beneficial.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:21:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:21:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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