2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150320
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The experience of being homeless: A phenomenological study
Abstract:
The experience of being homeless: A phenomenological study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Trice, Lucy, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Florida, College of Health
Title:Assistant Professor
The homeless population in the United States has increased

dramatically in the last decade. In 1984 the United States

Department of Housing and Urban Development estimated the homeless

population to be 250,000 - 350,000. By 1988 that estimate had

increased to 2 - 3 million. Among the homeless, the fastest growing

subgroup is families with dependent children. Currently, this

subgroup makes up 28 percent of the homeless population. When the

data from the 1990 census have been completely analyzed, these

figures will no doubt change, but given the economic climate,

probably not for the better. The purpose of this study was to

identify the essential structure of the experience of being homeless.

A phenomenological methodology was chosen in which participants were

asked to describe as fully as possible the experience of being

homeless. Protocols obtained were analyzed according to Colaizzi's

method. The sample was drawn from a population of women living in a

YWCA homeless shelter. The sample consisted of 10 women, 8 Black,

1 Caucasian, and 1 Oriental, ranging in age from 18 to 42 years.

Each of the participants had at least one dependent child, with the

number of children per participant ranging from 1 - 4 for a total of

17. Of this number, 9 were 6 years of age or younger. An exhaustive

description of the experience of being homeless was obtained

including the common themes of a) negative feelings, b) aloneness,

c)alienation from others, d) powerlessness, and e) strong desire

for independence. In order to meet the challenge of delivering

health care to this quickly growing segment of our population,

nurses must recognize that a) these families have similar needs in

terms of health promotion and maintenance that other families have,

and b) because of financial and other constraints, less means/

motivation to meet those needs. In addition, the psychological

impact of the homeless experience itself must be taken into account

in designing health care delivery systems if we are to successfully

the needs of this population.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe experience of being homeless: A phenomenological studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150320-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The experience of being homeless: A phenomenological study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Trice, Lucy, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Florida, College of Health</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The homeless population in the United States has increased<br/><br/>dramatically in the last decade. In 1984 the United States<br/><br/>Department of Housing and Urban Development estimated the homeless<br/><br/>population to be 250,000 - 350,000. By 1988 that estimate had<br/><br/>increased to 2 - 3 million. Among the homeless, the fastest growing<br/><br/>subgroup is families with dependent children. Currently, this<br/><br/>subgroup makes up 28 percent of the homeless population. When the<br/><br/>data from the 1990 census have been completely analyzed, these<br/><br/>figures will no doubt change, but given the economic climate,<br/><br/>probably not for the better. The purpose of this study was to<br/><br/>identify the essential structure of the experience of being homeless.<br/><br/>A phenomenological methodology was chosen in which participants were<br/><br/>asked to describe as fully as possible the experience of being<br/><br/>homeless. Protocols obtained were analyzed according to Colaizzi's<br/><br/>method. The sample was drawn from a population of women living in a<br/><br/>YWCA homeless shelter. The sample consisted of 10 women, 8 Black,<br/><br/>1 Caucasian, and 1 Oriental, ranging in age from 18 to 42 years.<br/><br/>Each of the participants had at least one dependent child, with the<br/><br/>number of children per participant ranging from 1 - 4 for a total of<br/><br/>17. Of this number, 9 were 6 years of age or younger. An exhaustive<br/><br/>description of the experience of being homeless was obtained<br/><br/>including the common themes of a) negative feelings, b) aloneness,<br/><br/>c)alienation from others, d) powerlessness, and e) strong desire<br/><br/>for independence. In order to meet the challenge of delivering<br/><br/>health care to this quickly growing segment of our population,<br/><br/>nurses must recognize that a) these families have similar needs in<br/><br/>terms of health promotion and maintenance that other families have,<br/><br/>and b) because of financial and other constraints, less means/<br/><br/>motivation to meet those needs. In addition, the psychological<br/><br/>impact of the homeless experience itself must be taken into account<br/><br/>in designing health care delivery systems if we are to successfully<br/><br/>the needs of this population.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:21:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:21:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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