Variables related to patient outcomes in COPD: Linking qualitative to quantitative research

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150321
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Variables related to patient outcomes in COPD: Linking qualitative to quantitative research
Abstract:
Variables related to patient outcomes in COPD: Linking qualitative to quantitative research
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Weaver, Terri, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships of physiological status, coping, and hardiness to functional outcomes in patients with COPD using both quantitative and qualitative methodology. Hardiness and coping strategies were viewed as mediating variables between physiological status and patient outcomes. The IOM model for stress research, consistent with Lazarus' theory of stress and coping, provided a framework for the study. The physiological status of 104 adults (85 men, 19 women) with COPD was measured using standardized Pulmonary Function Testing (PFT). The mean FEV1, and FVC were 1.61+or-.81 and 3.08+or-.95 liters respectively. Subjects completed the Health Related Hardiness Scale (HRHS), the Ways of Coping Questionnaire (WCQ) with three additional open-ended questions, a Pulmonary Function Status Scale (PFSS), and a 12-minute measured walk (12MD). Psychometric evaluation of the PFSS was acceptable (alpha>.80) and face validity was supported by qualitative data depicting perceived problem themes of dyspnea, activity limitations, and emotional adjustment. Quantitative data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), and Pearson Correlation Coefficients. Predictor variables for patient outcomes were examined by Multiple Regression Analysis. Open-ended responses were analyzed for recurrent themes related to coping. Themes were compared to those used in the WCQ and PFSS. Coping strategies did not relate to outcomes (l2MD:F=.509, p=.603; PIPS: F=.019, p=.982). Patients with COPD incorporated both problem-focused and emotion-focused strategies. Open-end response themes identified coping in terms of problem solving and positive reappraisal strategies (WCQ); the problems most frequently identified were adjustment to limitations and shortness of breath. Commitment (r=.18) and challenge (r=.21) components of hardiness had significant correlations (P<.05) with 12MD, whereas control did not. High hardy individuals used Planful Problem Solving strategies significantly more often (F=7.772, p=.006) than low hardy subjects and walked further with less Disproportionate Disability (t=1.96,p=.05). Physiological status and hardiness explained a greater amount of variance in distance walked (R squared = .187, p .0001) than in the PFSS score (R squared =.090, p=.008). The findings of this study suggest that COPD patients who were committed and viewed their illness as a challenge were more problem-focused and functional.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleVariables related to patient outcomes in COPD: Linking qualitative to quantitative researchen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150321-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Variables related to patient outcomes in COPD: Linking qualitative to quantitative research</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Weaver, Terri, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tew@nursing.upenn.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships of physiological status, coping, and hardiness to functional outcomes in patients with COPD using both quantitative and qualitative methodology. Hardiness and coping strategies were viewed as mediating variables between physiological status and patient outcomes. The IOM model for stress research, consistent with Lazarus' theory of stress and coping, provided a framework for the study. The physiological status of 104 adults (85 men, 19 women) with COPD was measured using standardized Pulmonary Function Testing (PFT). The mean FEV1, and FVC were 1.61+or-.81 and 3.08+or-.95 liters respectively. Subjects completed the Health Related Hardiness Scale (HRHS), the Ways of Coping Questionnaire (WCQ) with three additional open-ended questions, a Pulmonary Function Status Scale (PFSS), and a 12-minute measured walk (12MD). Psychometric evaluation of the PFSS was acceptable (alpha&gt;.80) and face validity was supported by qualitative data depicting perceived problem themes of dyspnea, activity limitations, and emotional adjustment. Quantitative data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), and Pearson Correlation Coefficients. Predictor variables for patient outcomes were examined by Multiple Regression Analysis. Open-ended responses were analyzed for recurrent themes related to coping. Themes were compared to those used in the WCQ and PFSS. Coping strategies did not relate to outcomes (l2MD:F=.509, p=.603; PIPS: F=.019, p=.982). Patients with COPD incorporated both problem-focused and emotion-focused strategies. Open-end response themes identified coping in terms of problem solving and positive reappraisal strategies (WCQ); the problems most frequently identified were adjustment to limitations and shortness of breath. Commitment (r=.18) and challenge (r=.21) components of hardiness had significant correlations (P&lt;.05) with 12MD, whereas control did not. High hardy individuals used Planful Problem Solving strategies significantly more often (F=7.772, p=.006) than low hardy subjects and walked further with less Disproportionate Disability (t=1.96,p=.05). Physiological status and hardiness explained a greater amount of variance in distance walked (R squared = .187, p .0001) than in the PFSS score (R squared =.090, p=.008). The findings of this study suggest that COPD patients who were committed and viewed their illness as a challenge were more problem-focused and functional.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:21:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:21:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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