A longitudinal perspective of the chronically ill child's school experience

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150325
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A longitudinal perspective of the chronically ill child's school experience
Abstract:
A longitudinal perspective of the chronically ill child's school experience
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Zoeller, Linda, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Purdue University - Calumet
Title:Associate Professor
It is estimated that between 10 and 15 percent of children in the

United States have some type of chronic health impairment

(Gortmaker, 1985). Children with a chronic illness are often

regular participants in their community school systems. This

situation presents special challenges for the child, the child's

family, and the school personnel who must juggle the child's

particular health needs with the need for a sound education. In

order to assist these children and their families to better

function in their communities, nursing needs to direct research

efforts toward better understanding how families respond to a

member's impaired health status. This enhances the nurse's ability

to provide family-centered care (Whall and Faucett, 1991).



As part of a larger, grounded theory research study of how families

define and manage a child's chronic illness (funded by NCNR,

R01594-03), this paper presents the results of the qualitative data

analysis that specifically focuses on the school experience of

those children diagnosed with diabetes who were 7 to 14 years old

and had no other major physical or mental impairments. One or both

parents and the child diagnosed with diabetes were interviewed

individually in the family's home using semi-structured interview

guides on two separate occasions twelve months apart. All

interviews were transcribed verbatim and processed using Ethnograph

software. Interview transcripts were also coded by question to

allow for an additional data retrieval method. In addition,

detailed family case summaries were completed in order to maintain

a more integrated overview of the family. Based upon these

analytic strategies, thematic codes were developed. This

presentation addresses evidence of change in the school experience

over the one year period including the number and nature of the

school contacts, perceived obstacles, the need for special

arrangements for the child relative to their chronic illness and

the impact on the child's school performance. This longitudinal

approach to analysis provides useful insight into the development

of an ongoing relationship between the family with a chronically

ill child member and the school system personnel.



Implications for nursing practice include the need to assess the

child's and family's ability to communicate effectively with school

personnel. Based upon this assessment, the nurse can more

effectively intervene and suggest strategies that the family can

employ to elicit the cooperation and appropriate participation of

teachers and other school personnel. Ultimately, the child with a

chronic illness will be better assured a successful school

experience.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA longitudinal perspective of the chronically ill child's school experienceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150325-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A longitudinal perspective of the chronically ill child's school experience</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zoeller, Linda, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Purdue University - Calumet</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">zoeller@calumet.purdue.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">It is estimated that between 10 and 15 percent of children in the<br/><br/>United States have some type of chronic health impairment<br/><br/>(Gortmaker, 1985). Children with a chronic illness are often<br/><br/>regular participants in their community school systems. This<br/><br/>situation presents special challenges for the child, the child's<br/><br/>family, and the school personnel who must juggle the child's<br/><br/>particular health needs with the need for a sound education. In<br/><br/>order to assist these children and their families to better<br/><br/>function in their communities, nursing needs to direct research<br/><br/>efforts toward better understanding how families respond to a<br/><br/>member's impaired health status. This enhances the nurse's ability<br/><br/>to provide family-centered care (Whall and Faucett, 1991).<br/><br/><br/><br/>As part of a larger, grounded theory research study of how families<br/><br/>define and manage a child's chronic illness (funded by NCNR,<br/><br/>R01594-03), this paper presents the results of the qualitative data<br/><br/>analysis that specifically focuses on the school experience of<br/><br/>those children diagnosed with diabetes who were 7 to 14 years old<br/><br/>and had no other major physical or mental impairments. One or both<br/><br/>parents and the child diagnosed with diabetes were interviewed<br/><br/>individually in the family's home using semi-structured interview<br/><br/>guides on two separate occasions twelve months apart. All<br/><br/>interviews were transcribed verbatim and processed using Ethnograph<br/><br/>software. Interview transcripts were also coded by question to<br/><br/>allow for an additional data retrieval method. In addition,<br/><br/>detailed family case summaries were completed in order to maintain<br/><br/>a more integrated overview of the family. Based upon these<br/><br/>analytic strategies, thematic codes were developed. This<br/><br/>presentation addresses evidence of change in the school experience<br/><br/>over the one year period including the number and nature of the<br/><br/>school contacts, perceived obstacles, the need for special<br/><br/>arrangements for the child relative to their chronic illness and<br/><br/>the impact on the child's school performance. This longitudinal<br/><br/>approach to analysis provides useful insight into the development<br/><br/>of an ongoing relationship between the family with a chronically<br/><br/>ill child member and the school system personnel.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Implications for nursing practice include the need to assess the<br/><br/>child's and family's ability to communicate effectively with school<br/><br/>personnel. Based upon this assessment, the nurse can more<br/><br/>effectively intervene and suggest strategies that the family can<br/><br/>employ to elicit the cooperation and appropriate participation of<br/><br/>teachers and other school personnel. Ultimately, the child with a<br/><br/>chronic illness will be better assured a successful school<br/><br/>experience.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:21:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:21:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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