2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150331
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A comparative study of irritable and non-irritable infants
Abstract:
A comparative study of irritable and non-irritable infants
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Keefe, Maureen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Medical University of South Carolina
This study compared developmental differences in the behavior of

irritable/nonirritable infants and parental perceptions/responses

to the irritable behavior over the first 4 months of life.



Forty-one infants/families participated after an initial interview

and parental informed consent. Visits every 3 weeks from 4 weeks

until 16 weeks of age were conducted with completion of a Fussiness

Rating Scale, a 24-hour activity report and a brief interview at

each visit. At 7 and 16 weeks the Nursing Child Assessment

Satellite Training (NCAST) Feeding Scale was used to score the

maternal/infants' behavior during feeding.



Twenty one infants with unexplained fussiness formed the irritable

group. The comparison group consisted of twenty infants

identified as non-irritable. The infants were comparable in sex,

birth weight, race, gestational age, parents' age, birth method,

birth order, SES and maternal education. Feeding at 1 month of age

was different for the 2 groups, 9 of the irritable infants were

bottle fed and 12 were breast fed compared to 3 bottle and 17

breast in the nonirritable group. NCAST observations revealed

overall group differences. Mothers of irritable infants

demonstrated less social and emotional growth fostering behaviors

and scored lower overall on the feeding observation; and irritable

infants were less responsive to their mothers. Mothers reported

more distress in response to their infant and stated the fussiness

effected their expectations of parenting.



Parents identified these interventions as most effective: special

positioning while carrying, placing the infant over a shoulder or

knees, movement i.e., swinging, rocking or bouncing, auditory

stimulation such as music, singing or talking and swaddling or

holding the infant close.



Irritability significantly diminished by 13 weeks for most infants.

Fathers continued to report irritability after the mothers reported

it gone. The amount, the length,and the intensity of the fussing

were reported by both the mother and father, the distress

experienced by each parent decreased from the first to the last

visit.



These findings are being used to design a nursing intervention

program for irritable infants. The approach will provide support

and individualized behavioral intervention.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA comparative study of irritable and non-irritable infantsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150331-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A comparative study of irritable and non-irritable infants</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Keefe, Maureen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Medical University of South Carolina</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">keefem@musc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study compared developmental differences in the behavior of<br/><br/>irritable/nonirritable infants and parental perceptions/responses<br/><br/>to the irritable behavior over the first 4 months of life.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Forty-one infants/families participated after an initial interview<br/><br/>and parental informed consent. Visits every 3 weeks from 4 weeks<br/><br/>until 16 weeks of age were conducted with completion of a Fussiness<br/><br/>Rating Scale, a 24-hour activity report and a brief interview at<br/><br/>each visit. At 7 and 16 weeks the Nursing Child Assessment<br/><br/>Satellite Training (NCAST) Feeding Scale was used to score the<br/><br/>maternal/infants' behavior during feeding.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Twenty one infants with unexplained fussiness formed the irritable<br/><br/>group. The comparison group consisted of twenty infants<br/><br/>identified as non-irritable. The infants were comparable in sex,<br/><br/>birth weight, race, gestational age, parents' age, birth method,<br/><br/>birth order, SES and maternal education. Feeding at 1 month of age<br/><br/>was different for the 2 groups, 9 of the irritable infants were<br/><br/>bottle fed and 12 were breast fed compared to 3 bottle and 17<br/><br/>breast in the nonirritable group. NCAST observations revealed<br/><br/>overall group differences. Mothers of irritable infants<br/><br/>demonstrated less social and emotional growth fostering behaviors<br/><br/>and scored lower overall on the feeding observation; and irritable<br/><br/>infants were less responsive to their mothers. Mothers reported<br/><br/>more distress in response to their infant and stated the fussiness<br/><br/>effected their expectations of parenting.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Parents identified these interventions as most effective: special<br/><br/>positioning while carrying, placing the infant over a shoulder or<br/><br/>knees, movement i.e., swinging, rocking or bouncing, auditory<br/><br/>stimulation such as music, singing or talking and swaddling or<br/><br/>holding the infant close.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Irritability significantly diminished by 13 weeks for most infants.<br/><br/>Fathers continued to report irritability after the mothers reported<br/><br/>it gone. The amount, the length,and the intensity of the fussing<br/><br/>were reported by both the mother and father, the distress<br/><br/>experienced by each parent decreased from the first to the last<br/><br/>visit.<br/><br/><br/><br/>These findings are being used to design a nursing intervention<br/><br/>program for irritable infants. The approach will provide support<br/><br/>and individualized behavioral intervention.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:21:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:21:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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