2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150334
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Consumer satisfaction with inpatient services
Abstract:
Consumer satisfaction with inpatient services
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Howard, Patricia
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kentucky
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to measure satisfaction with inpatient services and select outcomes of mental health services in two public psychiatric hospitals. DESIGN: A simple survey design with non-random sampling technique was utilized in this study. Recovered consumers of mental health services collected data from respondents. SAMPLE: The sample consisted of individuals receiving inpatient services who were near discharge from the hospital. At site 1, 103 clients responded to the survey; at site 2, 101 clients responded. SETTING: Two public psychiatric inpatient facilities in a southeastern state were the setting for the study. NAMES OF VARIABLES/CONCEPTS: Consumer satisfaction with inpatient mental health services was the focus of the study. Domains explored included the physical environment, efforts to promote affiliation and esteem, facilitation of goal attainment, self-actualization, and outcomes of services. MEASURES/INSTRUMENTS: The study utilized the Kentucky Consumer Satisfaction Instrument (KY-CSI), the Mental Health Statistics Improvement Program (MHSIP) 20-item Consumer Survey, and the Consumer Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ-8). FINDINGS: Respondents at both hospitals reported greatest satisfaction with the physical environments of the hospitals, having time to be with other patients, knowing what was expected of them during treatment, being able to talk to staff about their problems, and receiving the services that they needed to recover. Areas of greatest dissatisfaction included lack of privacy, not being asked what they thought would help them recover, lack of medication education from staff, the exclusion of family members and friends from treatment planning, and select outcomes of treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, respondents reported high levels of satisfaction with inpatient care. Affiliations with other patients and availability of staff were areas of greatest satisfaction. At the same time, certain aspects of the patient-staff relationship, including involvement of patients in their own treatment planning and medication education, were areas of dissatisfaction. Likewise, treatment related to patient-family affiliation were areas of dissatisfaction. IMPLICATIONS: Placing more emphasis on consumer and family involvement in treatment planning and the provision of medication education may enhance satisfaction with care. These issues can be addressed by providing staff education and training related recovery issues and modification of treatment planning protocols.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleConsumer satisfaction with inpatient servicesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150334-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Consumer satisfaction with inpatient services</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Howard, Patricia</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kentucky</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pbhowa00@pop.uky.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to measure satisfaction with inpatient services and select outcomes of mental health services in two public psychiatric hospitals. DESIGN: A simple survey design with non-random sampling technique was utilized in this study. Recovered consumers of mental health services collected data from respondents. SAMPLE: The sample consisted of individuals receiving inpatient services who were near discharge from the hospital. At site 1, 103 clients responded to the survey; at site 2, 101 clients responded. SETTING: Two public psychiatric inpatient facilities in a southeastern state were the setting for the study. NAMES OF VARIABLES/CONCEPTS: Consumer satisfaction with inpatient mental health services was the focus of the study. Domains explored included the physical environment, efforts to promote affiliation and esteem, facilitation of goal attainment, self-actualization, and outcomes of services. MEASURES/INSTRUMENTS: The study utilized the Kentucky Consumer Satisfaction Instrument (KY-CSI), the Mental Health Statistics Improvement Program (MHSIP) 20-item Consumer Survey, and the Consumer Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ-8). FINDINGS: Respondents at both hospitals reported greatest satisfaction with the physical environments of the hospitals, having time to be with other patients, knowing what was expected of them during treatment, being able to talk to staff about their problems, and receiving the services that they needed to recover. Areas of greatest dissatisfaction included lack of privacy, not being asked what they thought would help them recover, lack of medication education from staff, the exclusion of family members and friends from treatment planning, and select outcomes of treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, respondents reported high levels of satisfaction with inpatient care. Affiliations with other patients and availability of staff were areas of greatest satisfaction. At the same time, certain aspects of the patient-staff relationship, including involvement of patients in their own treatment planning and medication education, were areas of dissatisfaction. Likewise, treatment related to patient-family affiliation were areas of dissatisfaction. IMPLICATIONS: Placing more emphasis on consumer and family involvement in treatment planning and the provision of medication education may enhance satisfaction with care. These issues can be addressed by providing staff education and training related recovery issues and modification of treatment planning protocols.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:21:57Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:21:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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