The Effects of Music on the Heart using an Electrophysiologic Approach

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150340
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of Music on the Heart using an Electrophysiologic Approach
Abstract:
The Effects of Music on the Heart using an Electrophysiologic Approach
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Prasun, Marilyn, PhD, CCNS, FAHA
P.I. Institution Name:Millikin University
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Jennifer Mackinnon, MD; Abraham G. Kocheril, MD
[Scientific Session Presentation] Introduction: Heart rate variability (HVR) is a cardiovascular predictor of morbidity and mortality. However, little is known regarding the effects of music on th eautonomic function of the heart. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of music on cardiac conduction, recovery and effective refractory periods (ERP) of patients presenting to the electrophysiology (EP) laboratory.  Methods: A prospective, case control study was performed on 20 patients, who presented with standard indications for an EP study. The musical selection was Canon in D by Johann Pachelbel, performed on a non-amplified Grand Concert Pedal Harp. Once patients were sedated the music was played for 10 minutes. Data was collected during the initial phase of the EP study (control), five minutes into the musical intervention, and five minutes after the music was completed. The data measurements included: conduction intervals (AA, AH, HV), sino-atrial conduction time (SACT), sinus node recovery time (SNRT), and ERP. Results: Lengthening of the AA interval (heart rate slowing), SNRT, and AV nodal ERP were observed, consistent with parasympathetic tone. A significant shortening of the ventricular ERP was observed (Table 1.). Conclusions: Measures of parasympathetic tone were increased. In addition, a statistically significant shortening of the ventricular ERP was observed suggesting a sympathetic component. Response to music is a combination of sympathetic and parasympathetic influences and both were active in the sedated patient. Further research is warranted regarding the impact of music on cardiac conduction.Table 1. VariableControlPost MusicpAA670.3724.80.14AH103.0106.10.26HV49.547.30.34SNRT1017.11079.30.12SACT173.0191.20.30AERP245.1248.10.68AVNERP342.4379.70.09VERP249.3242.20.05**Indicates significance (p<0.05).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of Music on the Heart using an Electrophysiologic Approachen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150340-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects of Music on the Heart using an Electrophysiologic Approach</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Prasun, Marilyn, PhD, CCNS, FAHA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Millikin University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mprasun@millikin.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jennifer Mackinnon, MD; Abraham G. Kocheril, MD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific Session Presentation] Introduction: Heart rate variability (HVR) is a cardiovascular predictor of morbidity and mortality. However, little is known regarding the effects of music on th eautonomic function of the heart. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of music on cardiac conduction, recovery and effective refractory periods (ERP) of patients presenting to the electrophysiology (EP) laboratory. &nbsp;Methods: A prospective, case control study was performed on 20 patients, who presented with standard indications for an EP study. The musical selection was Canon in D by Johann Pachelbel, performed on a non-amplified Grand Concert Pedal Harp. Once patients were sedated the music was played for 10 minutes. Data was collected during the initial phase of the EP study (control), five minutes into the musical intervention, and five minutes after the music was completed. The data measurements included: conduction intervals (AA, AH, HV), sino-atrial conduction time (SACT), sinus node recovery time (SNRT), and ERP. Results: Lengthening of the AA interval (heart rate slowing), SNRT, and AV nodal ERP were observed, consistent with parasympathetic tone. A significant shortening of the ventricular ERP was observed (Table 1.). Conclusions: Measures of parasympathetic tone were increased. In addition, a statistically significant shortening of the ventricular ERP was observed suggesting a sympathetic component. Response to music is a combination of sympathetic and parasympathetic influences and both were active in the sedated patient. Further research is warranted regarding the impact of music on cardiac conduction.Table 1. VariableControlPost MusicpAA670.3724.80.14AH103.0106.10.26HV49.547.30.34SNRT1017.11079.30.12SACT173.0191.20.30AERP245.1248.10.68AVNERP342.4379.70.09VERP249.3242.20.05**Indicates significance (p&lt;0.05).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:22:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:22:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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