Group climate: A significant retention factor for nurse managers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150344
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Group climate: A significant retention factor for nurse managers
Abstract:
Group climate: A significant retention factor for nurse managers
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Hern-Underwood, Marcia, EdD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Cincinnati
Title:Assistant Professor
The nursing shortage is not a contrived dilemma. The majority of

hospitals in the United States report a doubling of their vacancy

rates for registered nurses.



Hence, the purpose of this study was to determine if there was a

relationship between head nurses' leadership effectiveness in the

pediatric hospital organization with the retention of their staff

nurses, given the current nursing shortage situation. Fiedler's

Contingency Theory of Leadership Effectiveness was the theoretical

framework applied to this analysis. A convenience sample for this

correlational design study consisted of 34 head nurses and 176

full-time registered nurses employed in seven pediatric medical

center hospitals across a tri-state area of the midwestern portion

of the United States.



In addition to a demographic profile about the individual head

nurse and the nursing unit which was managed, each head nurse was

asked to complete Fiedler's four Leader Match Scales. The four

scales included the Least Preferred Co-worker Scale, the

Leader-Member Relations Scale (LMR), the Task Structure Rating

Scale and the Position Power Scale. These scales have been well

tested since 1951 and possess a split-half reliability ranging from

.90 to .64. Each head nurse also distributed the LMR Scale and

demographic profile to six full-time registered nurses, three of

whom were categorized as stayers and three as joiners.



The data were analyzed with correlational coefficient statistics,

using an alpha level of p <.05. Although the majority of the head

nurse sample were found to be effective leaders, using task

motivational styles, no significant correlations were found

associated with staff nurses' retention rates.



Group climate was found to be the most important variable in this

study. Group climate, as measured by the LMR, was significantly

associated with the head nurses ability to delegate tasks and to

make decisions with confidence, for both the joiner and stayer

groups. The null hypothesis for the perceptions of head nurses and

staff nurses about leader-member relations was rejected; group

climate was significantly associated for both the stayer and

total staff group perceptions, with the head nurses perceptions.

There was no significant association between the joiners and the

head nurses' perceptions about group climate.



It is recommended that a larger study be replicated with head

nurses from multiple adult medical-surgical hospitals within a

single metropolitan city, or with female managers in either the

business or engineering professions. In addition, further study

should examine the relationship between group climate and

retention.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGroup climate: A significant retention factor for nurse managersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150344-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Group climate: A significant retention factor for nurse managers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hern-Underwood, Marcia, EdD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Cincinnati</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">marcia.hern@uc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The nursing shortage is not a contrived dilemma. The majority of<br/><br/>hospitals in the United States report a doubling of their vacancy<br/><br/>rates for registered nurses.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Hence, the purpose of this study was to determine if there was a<br/><br/>relationship between head nurses' leadership effectiveness in the<br/><br/>pediatric hospital organization with the retention of their staff<br/><br/>nurses, given the current nursing shortage situation. Fiedler's<br/><br/>Contingency Theory of Leadership Effectiveness was the theoretical<br/><br/>framework applied to this analysis. A convenience sample for this<br/><br/>correlational design study consisted of 34 head nurses and 176<br/><br/>full-time registered nurses employed in seven pediatric medical<br/><br/>center hospitals across a tri-state area of the midwestern portion<br/><br/>of the United States.<br/><br/><br/><br/>In addition to a demographic profile about the individual head<br/><br/>nurse and the nursing unit which was managed, each head nurse was<br/><br/>asked to complete Fiedler's four Leader Match Scales. The four<br/><br/>scales included the Least Preferred Co-worker Scale, the<br/><br/>Leader-Member Relations Scale (LMR), the Task Structure Rating<br/><br/>Scale and the Position Power Scale. These scales have been well<br/><br/>tested since 1951 and possess a split-half reliability ranging from<br/><br/>.90 to .64. Each head nurse also distributed the LMR Scale and<br/><br/>demographic profile to six full-time registered nurses, three of<br/><br/>whom were categorized as stayers and three as joiners.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The data were analyzed with correlational coefficient statistics,<br/><br/>using an alpha level of p &lt;.05. Although the majority of the head<br/><br/>nurse sample were found to be effective leaders, using task<br/><br/>motivational styles, no significant correlations were found<br/><br/>associated with staff nurses' retention rates.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Group climate was found to be the most important variable in this<br/><br/>study. Group climate, as measured by the LMR, was significantly<br/><br/>associated with the head nurses ability to delegate tasks and to<br/><br/>make decisions with confidence, for both the joiner and stayer<br/><br/>groups. The null hypothesis for the perceptions of head nurses and<br/><br/>staff nurses about leader-member relations was rejected; group<br/><br/>climate was significantly associated for both the stayer and<br/><br/>total staff group perceptions, with the head nurses perceptions.<br/><br/>There was no significant association between the joiners and the<br/><br/>head nurses' perceptions about group climate.<br/><br/><br/><br/>It is recommended that a larger study be replicated with head<br/><br/>nurses from multiple adult medical-surgical hospitals within a<br/><br/>single metropolitan city, or with female managers in either the<br/><br/>business or engineering professions. In addition, further study<br/><br/>should examine the relationship between group climate and<br/><br/>retention.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:22:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:22:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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