Hormonal, growth, race, genetic and dietary influences on blood pressure in school age children

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150345
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hormonal, growth, race, genetic and dietary influences on blood pressure in school age children
Abstract:
Hormonal, growth, race, genetic and dietary influences on blood pressure in school age children
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Jones, Jerrlyn, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE
P.I. Institution Name:Stropes and Bammann
Title:
As growth and development progress in children, blood pressure (BP) increases gradually. The mechanisms for this phenomenon are not fully understood. This multifaceted 5 year longitudinal study examined some hormonal, racial, growth, genetic and dietary factors which may relate to the development of hypertension (HT). Seven hundred fifty subjects, ages 5.5 - 12.5, were recruited from 18 schools. Blacks comprised 1/3 of the population. Fifty five percent of the total population were male. Anthropometric measurements and BPs were obtained every 6 months. Overnight urine specimens were used as a non-invasive way to quantify aldosterone (a sodium retaining hormone) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-s for adrenarche staging). Urinary K+ and Na+ were used as dietary intake assessment. Race, age and gender differences were also analyzed. We obtained family health histories to trace HT tendencies. A history was positive (+FH) if either parent or both had HT. The attrition rate for the study was less than the predicted 25 percent. Newsletters were generated to discuss the study findings to the parents and schools. Post measurement letters weresent to the parent(s) and family physicians, if indicated, to discuss the measurement results.



We found that black children had higher systolic (p<0.00l) and diastolic pressures (p=0.037) than white children. Blacks secreted less aldosterone (p<0.001). K+ excretion was inversely related with BP whereas, Na+ excretion was positively related. Urinary K+ was decreased in blacks (p<0.001) whereas, Na+ excretion was equal in blacks and whites. Aldosterone excretion correlated with K+ excretion (p<0.001). Central obesity and DHEA-s related positively to BP (p=0.002). DHEA-s excretion was higher in blacks (p=0.0099). Black children had 55 percent more +FH for HT. Black and white children with +FH had higher weight adjusted systolic (p=0.003) and diastolic (p=0.008) pressures. We found that there was a genetic influence in both blacks and whites.



The data suggest that there is a link between reduced aldosterone production and HT. Additional studies will need to assess the need for dietary changes and the tendency for adult HT as predicted by childhood and adolescent BP tracking. Identification and verification during childhood of hormonal, genetic and dietary patterning might be used diagnostically to identify those at risk for chronic cardiovascular disease. Implications for nursing are that health education and collaboration with school officials, teachers and the community should include a basic knowledge of BP and annual BP checks for school children.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHormonal, growth, race, genetic and dietary influences on blood pressure in school age childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150345-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hormonal, growth, race, genetic and dietary influences on blood pressure in school age children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jones, Jerrlyn, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Stropes and Bammann</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value"> </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">As growth and development progress in children, blood pressure (BP) increases gradually. The mechanisms for this phenomenon are not fully understood. This multifaceted 5 year longitudinal study examined some hormonal, racial, growth, genetic and dietary factors which may relate to the development of hypertension (HT). Seven hundred fifty subjects, ages 5.5 - 12.5, were recruited from 18 schools. Blacks comprised 1/3 of the population. Fifty five percent of the total population were male. Anthropometric measurements and BPs were obtained every 6 months. Overnight urine specimens were used as a non-invasive way to quantify aldosterone (a sodium retaining hormone) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-s for adrenarche staging). Urinary K+ and Na+ were used as dietary intake assessment. Race, age and gender differences were also analyzed. We obtained family health histories to trace HT tendencies. A history was positive (+FH) if either parent or both had HT. The attrition rate for the study was less than the predicted 25 percent. Newsletters were generated to discuss the study findings to the parents and schools. Post measurement letters weresent to the parent(s) and family physicians, if indicated, to discuss the measurement results.<br/><br/><br/><br/>We found that black children had higher systolic (p&lt;0.00l) and diastolic pressures (p=0.037) than white children. Blacks secreted less aldosterone (p&lt;0.001). K+ excretion was inversely related with BP whereas, Na+ excretion was positively related. Urinary K+ was decreased in blacks (p&lt;0.001) whereas, Na+ excretion was equal in blacks and whites. Aldosterone excretion correlated with K+ excretion (p&lt;0.001). Central obesity and DHEA-s related positively to BP (p=0.002). DHEA-s excretion was higher in blacks (p=0.0099). Black children had 55 percent more +FH for HT. Black and white children with +FH had higher weight adjusted systolic (p=0.003) and diastolic (p=0.008) pressures. We found that there was a genetic influence in both blacks and whites.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The data suggest that there is a link between reduced aldosterone production and HT. Additional studies will need to assess the need for dietary changes and the tendency for adult HT as predicted by childhood and adolescent BP tracking. Identification and verification during childhood of hormonal, genetic and dietary patterning might be used diagnostically to identify those at risk for chronic cardiovascular disease. Implications for nursing are that health education and collaboration with school officials, teachers and the community should include a basic knowledge of BP and annual BP checks for school children.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:22:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:22:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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