Congruence between nurses and hospitalized adults on the perceived importance of selected nursing activities

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150346
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Congruence between nurses and hospitalized adults on the perceived importance of selected nursing activities
Abstract:
Congruence between nurses and hospitalized adults on the perceived importance of selected nursing activities
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Konnerth, Karlita, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE
P.I. Institution Name:Tampa General Hospital
Title:Cardiovascular Clinical Nurse Specialist
The interpersonal relationship between the nurse and the patient is

vitally important to the success of the nursing process. Priority

differences may influence the process and outcome of the

professional relationship. Conflicting research exists regarding

what the main concerns of nursing actually are. If society is to

value the services provided by nurses, the profession must

demonstrate that the services provided are meeting consumers'

needs. The problem studied was the congruence between nurses and

hospitalized adults on the perceived importance of selected nursing

activities. It was designed to answer the following research

questions; What are the patients' group ratings of the importance

of selected nursing activities?, What are the nurses' group ratings

of the importance of selected nursing activities?, What is the

group relationship between the ratings of patients compared to the

ratings of nurses?, What is the difference between the ratings of

the nurse and the ratings of the patient in the matched

nurse-patient pairs?. The nursing process and Imogene King's

transactional model of nursing provided the conceptual framework

for this study. King's model was chosen because the concepts are

highly applicable to the variables which were factors influencing

priorities. The review of literature consisted of a chronological

survey of selected studies from early 50's through 1984 that

focused on which nursing activities or behaviors were perceived by

patients and nurses as being important or as constituting quality

of care. Methodology used for this study was based on a design and

tool developed by White in 1970 and later published in Nursing

Research in 1972. Matched nurse-patient pairs were given identical

nursing activities checklists and were asked to rate the importance

of each activity as it pertained to the individual patient's care.

The final sample consisted of 40 nurse-patient pairs who met

certain established criteria. A Chi square was done on each item

and then the items and their Chi square values were grouped

according to the three categories of nursing activities (physical

care, psychosocial care, and preparation for discharge). To

determine congruence on individual nursing activity items a table

was set up to compare the average ratings of importance.

Comparison of average differences was done to determine areas of

greatest agreement/disagreement. Findings indicated that physical

care items were rated more important by patients than nurses and

psychosocial care items were rated more important by nurses than

patients. These findings were consistent with White's findings.

Preparation for discharge items were rated at a medium level of

importance by nurses and patients, whereas White found they had

relatively little importance for both.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCongruence between nurses and hospitalized adults on the perceived importance of selected nursing activitiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150346-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Congruence between nurses and hospitalized adults on the perceived importance of selected nursing activities</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Konnerth, Karlita, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Tampa General Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Cardiovascular Clinical Nurse Specialist</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The interpersonal relationship between the nurse and the patient is<br/><br/>vitally important to the success of the nursing process. Priority<br/><br/>differences may influence the process and outcome of the<br/><br/>professional relationship. Conflicting research exists regarding<br/><br/>what the main concerns of nursing actually are. If society is to<br/><br/>value the services provided by nurses, the profession must<br/><br/>demonstrate that the services provided are meeting consumers'<br/><br/>needs. The problem studied was the congruence between nurses and<br/><br/>hospitalized adults on the perceived importance of selected nursing<br/><br/>activities. It was designed to answer the following research<br/><br/>questions; What are the patients' group ratings of the importance<br/><br/>of selected nursing activities?, What are the nurses' group ratings<br/><br/>of the importance of selected nursing activities?, What is the<br/><br/>group relationship between the ratings of patients compared to the<br/><br/>ratings of nurses?, What is the difference between the ratings of<br/><br/>the nurse and the ratings of the patient in the matched<br/><br/>nurse-patient pairs?. The nursing process and Imogene King's<br/><br/>transactional model of nursing provided the conceptual framework<br/><br/>for this study. King's model was chosen because the concepts are<br/><br/>highly applicable to the variables which were factors influencing<br/><br/>priorities. The review of literature consisted of a chronological<br/><br/>survey of selected studies from early 50's through 1984 that<br/><br/>focused on which nursing activities or behaviors were perceived by<br/><br/>patients and nurses as being important or as constituting quality<br/><br/>of care. Methodology used for this study was based on a design and<br/><br/>tool developed by White in 1970 and later published in Nursing<br/><br/>Research in 1972. Matched nurse-patient pairs were given identical<br/><br/>nursing activities checklists and were asked to rate the importance<br/><br/>of each activity as it pertained to the individual patient's care.<br/><br/>The final sample consisted of 40 nurse-patient pairs who met<br/><br/>certain established criteria. A Chi square was done on each item<br/><br/>and then the items and their Chi square values were grouped<br/><br/>according to the three categories of nursing activities (physical<br/><br/>care, psychosocial care, and preparation for discharge). To<br/><br/>determine congruence on individual nursing activity items a table<br/><br/>was set up to compare the average ratings of importance.<br/><br/>Comparison of average differences was done to determine areas of<br/><br/>greatest agreement/disagreement. Findings indicated that physical<br/><br/>care items were rated more important by patients than nurses and<br/><br/>psychosocial care items were rated more important by nurses than<br/><br/>patients. These findings were consistent with White's findings.<br/><br/>Preparation for discharge items were rated at a medium level of<br/><br/>importance by nurses and patients, whereas White found they had<br/><br/>relatively little importance for both.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:22:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:22:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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