Factors influencing retention and attrition of nurse educators in institutions of higher education in Arkansas

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150347
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors influencing retention and attrition of nurse educators in institutions of higher education in Arkansas
Abstract:
Factors influencing retention and attrition of nurse educators in institutions of higher education in Arkansas
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Lambert, Helen, EdD
P.I. Institution Name:Harding University
The primary focus of this study was to determine factors

influencing retention and attrition of nurse educators in

institutions of higher education in Arkansas. The serious shortage

of nursing faculty and the paucity of research on this topic

supported the need for the study. The research design was

primarily descriptive, and in the data analysis, both descriptive

and inferential statistics were used. With the exception of those

who left one school, a researcher designed questionnaire was

distributed to the entire population of nurse educators. One

hundred thirty-six nurse educators (65%) currently employed in

seven baccalaureate, twelve associate degree, and two graduate

programs and 36(55%) who left the institutions since May, 1984,

cited 293 factors influencing retention and 256 influencing

attrition. These factors were grouped into sixteen work-related

categories and ranked according to frequency of responses. The

major factors influencing the retention group to remain were the

convenience of their work schedules and interpersonal relations

with the students and colleagues. Low salary and excessive

workload were the factors most likely to cause them to leave.

Changes in their spouses' work caused more of the attrition group

to leave than any other factor. Working conditions, interpersonal

relations, and retirement were also major attrition factors. When

asked what factors would have influenced those in the attrition

group to remain, a majority of the comments focused on specific

concerns for their spouse and family. Higher salary ranked second.

Additionally, the study indicated no statistical significant

difference in overall job satisfaction of the retention and

attrition groups nor in the way they viewed their institution and

nurse-educator role. The demographic data in both groups were more

similar than dissimilar. When the educators were asked what they

valued the most about their job, interpersonal relationships with

students and colleagues and the work itself were the two factors

that ranked highest in both groups. Data from 36 follow-up

telephone interviews validated the data obtained from the written

questionnaires. Along with recommendations for increasing

retention and decreasing attrition of nurse educators, additional

findings and their implications are addressed.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors influencing retention and attrition of nurse educators in institutions of higher education in Arkansasen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150347-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors influencing retention and attrition of nurse educators in institutions of higher education in Arkansas</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lambert, Helen, EdD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Harding University</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The primary focus of this study was to determine factors<br/><br/>influencing retention and attrition of nurse educators in<br/><br/>institutions of higher education in Arkansas. The serious shortage<br/><br/>of nursing faculty and the paucity of research on this topic<br/><br/>supported the need for the study. The research design was<br/><br/>primarily descriptive, and in the data analysis, both descriptive<br/><br/>and inferential statistics were used. With the exception of those<br/><br/>who left one school, a researcher designed questionnaire was<br/><br/>distributed to the entire population of nurse educators. One<br/><br/>hundred thirty-six nurse educators (65%) currently employed in<br/><br/>seven baccalaureate, twelve associate degree, and two graduate<br/><br/>programs and 36(55%) who left the institutions since May, 1984,<br/><br/>cited 293 factors influencing retention and 256 influencing<br/><br/>attrition. These factors were grouped into sixteen work-related<br/><br/>categories and ranked according to frequency of responses. The<br/><br/>major factors influencing the retention group to remain were the<br/><br/>convenience of their work schedules and interpersonal relations<br/><br/>with the students and colleagues. Low salary and excessive<br/><br/>workload were the factors most likely to cause them to leave.<br/><br/>Changes in their spouses' work caused more of the attrition group<br/><br/>to leave than any other factor. Working conditions, interpersonal<br/><br/>relations, and retirement were also major attrition factors. When<br/><br/>asked what factors would have influenced those in the attrition<br/><br/>group to remain, a majority of the comments focused on specific<br/><br/>concerns for their spouse and family. Higher salary ranked second.<br/><br/>Additionally, the study indicated no statistical significant<br/><br/>difference in overall job satisfaction of the retention and<br/><br/>attrition groups nor in the way they viewed their institution and<br/><br/>nurse-educator role. The demographic data in both groups were more<br/><br/>similar than dissimilar. When the educators were asked what they<br/><br/>valued the most about their job, interpersonal relationships with<br/><br/>students and colleagues and the work itself were the two factors<br/><br/>that ranked highest in both groups. Data from 36 follow-up<br/><br/>telephone interviews validated the data obtained from the written<br/><br/>questionnaires. Along with recommendations for increasing<br/><br/>retention and decreasing attrition of nurse educators, additional<br/><br/>findings and their implications are addressed.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:22:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:22:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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