Stressful events and ways of coping of baccalaureate student nurses in the clinical laboratory

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150349
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Stressful events and ways of coping of baccalaureate student nurses in the clinical laboratory
Abstract:
Stressful events and ways of coping of baccalaureate student nurses in the clinical laboratory
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Zweig, Nancy, EdD
P.I. Institution Name:Mount Saint Mary College
Title:Associate Professor
The purposes of this exploratory study were: (1) to identify and describe events in the clinical laboratory that are stressful to baccalaureate student nurses; (2) to determine how student nurses cope with those stresses; and (3) to determine whether there is a relationship between categories of stress reported and types of coping utilized.



The knowledge concerning categories of reported stress in the clinical laboratory and types of coping utilized would be useful to nurse faculty in planning and implementing the clinical laboratory to enhance learning. It may be useful to nursing school administrators in making decisions concerning cost-effective use of the clinical laboratory. This knowledge may also be useful in graduate education in the preparation of nurse educators.



Fox and Diamond (1965) conducted a landmark study of stress and satisfaction of student nurses and identified the clinical area as being the most stressful for all levels of students from both diploma and baccalaureate programs. The clinical area as a source of stress was supported in subsequent studies and the educational process, not patient care, was identified as the main source of stress. Parkes (1985) is the only study that attempted to identify coping modes in response to a stressful episode using the theory of Lazarus and Folkman (1984) of stress and coping as a process. The final sample consisted of 246 volunteers from ten National League for Nursing accredited generic baccalaureate nursing programs in New York State. The critical incident technique was the basis of data collection for the stressful event and the pencil-and-paper format was utilized. The Ways of Coping Scale developed by Lazarus and Folkman was utilized to determine the type of coping mode employed during the stressful event.



Content analysis was used to categorize the reported stressful events. Correlated sample t-tests were used to determine the predominant coping mode. A chi-square test was performed to determine if a relationship existed between stress category and type of coping mode.



The findings suggest that the major combined sources of stress are not patient care but are related to components of the educational process in the clinical laboratory. Although the majority of subjects used predominantly more problem-focused coping than emotion-focused coping, it cannot be concluded that the proportion of subjects who used primarily problem-focused coping differ as a function of the category of stressful events.



Informal evaluation and instructor-student relationships emerged as both primary and secondary factors in inducing stress in the clinical laboratory.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStressful events and ways of coping of baccalaureate student nurses in the clinical laboratoryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150349-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Stressful events and ways of coping of baccalaureate student nurses in the clinical laboratory</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zweig, Nancy, EdD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Mount Saint Mary College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purposes of this exploratory study were: (1) to identify and describe events in the clinical laboratory that are stressful to baccalaureate student nurses; (2) to determine how student nurses cope with those stresses; and (3) to determine whether there is a relationship between categories of stress reported and types of coping utilized.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The knowledge concerning categories of reported stress in the clinical laboratory and types of coping utilized would be useful to nurse faculty in planning and implementing the clinical laboratory to enhance learning. It may be useful to nursing school administrators in making decisions concerning cost-effective use of the clinical laboratory. This knowledge may also be useful in graduate education in the preparation of nurse educators.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Fox and Diamond (1965) conducted a landmark study of stress and satisfaction of student nurses and identified the clinical area as being the most stressful for all levels of students from both diploma and baccalaureate programs. The clinical area as a source of stress was supported in subsequent studies and the educational process, not patient care, was identified as the main source of stress. Parkes (1985) is the only study that attempted to identify coping modes in response to a stressful episode using the theory of Lazarus and Folkman (1984) of stress and coping as a process. The final sample consisted of 246 volunteers from ten National League for Nursing accredited generic baccalaureate nursing programs in New York State. The critical incident technique was the basis of data collection for the stressful event and the pencil-and-paper format was utilized. The Ways of Coping Scale developed by Lazarus and Folkman was utilized to determine the type of coping mode employed during the stressful event.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Content analysis was used to categorize the reported stressful events. Correlated sample t-tests were used to determine the predominant coping mode. A chi-square test was performed to determine if a relationship existed between stress category and type of coping mode.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The findings suggest that the major combined sources of stress are not patient care but are related to components of the educational process in the clinical laboratory. Although the majority of subjects used predominantly more problem-focused coping than emotion-focused coping, it cannot be concluded that the proportion of subjects who used primarily problem-focused coping differ as a function of the category of stressful events.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Informal evaluation and instructor-student relationships emerged as both primary and secondary factors in inducing stress in the clinical laboratory.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:22:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:22:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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