Identification of a social support, anxiety and depression profile for males at risk for sudden cardiac death and males with a diagnosis of cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150350
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Identification of a social support, anxiety and depression profile for males at risk for sudden cardiac death and males with a diagnosis of cancer
Abstract:
Identification of a social support, anxiety and depression profile for males at risk for sudden cardiac death and males with a diagnosis of cancer
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Friedmann, Erika, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Brooklyn College
Title:Professor
Heart disease and cancer are the number one and two causes of death

among adults in the United States, together accounting for

approximately 60 percent of the total mortality. The two diseases

are comparable in mortality. Although deaths due to heart disease

have declined slightly in recent years, the death rate for cancer

continues to increase. The trauma associated with a myocardial

infarction has been equated with that of a diagnosis of cancer.

Both types of patients experience an event which divides their

lives into two qualitatively distinct periods, pre- and

post-diagnosis. Both groups of patients must face the possibility

of death in the near future, decreased physical capabilities,

increased dependence, loss of job and other social roles and major

reorientation or change in life goals (Donaldson, McCorkle,

Georgiadou, Benoliel, 1986). Since persons with these two

diagnoses face similar challenges and are often treated differently

by the health care team, it would be important to know if persons

are similar or different on selected stress factors.



The purpose of this study was to compare the social and

psychological stress profiles of males who were at risk for sudden

cardiac death (SCD) and of a second group of males with a diagnosis

of cancer. The effect of life threatening illness on 82 males, (65

Caucasians or 79 percent, 17 non-Caucasians or 21%) at risk for

sudden cardiac death (ScD), and 77 males (50 Caucasians or 65 percent,

27 non-Caucasians or 35%) with a diagnosis of cancer was assessed.

Social support was assessed via Saranson's Social Support

Questionnaire-6 (SSQ-6). The psychological factors of anxiety and

depression were assessed using Speilburger's State-Trait Anxiety

Inventory (STAI) and Sung's Depression Scale respectively.

Possible differences in profiles were analyzed via MANOVA.

Differences in individual scales of social support, anxiety and

depression were analyzed using ANOVA. Results confirmed that

members of both groups were similar on demographic factors, state

and trait anxiety, depression and on the amount of and satisfaction

with social support. Based on the results of this study, the

psychosocial stress profile for males at risk for SCD and males

with a diagnosis of cancer did not differ.



Since there were differences in the racial distributions in the two

groups, the effects of race on the psychosocial variables was also

examined. Results indicated that race was related to psychosocial

scores. State anxiety was significantly higher and scores related

to trait anxiety and depression tended to be higher in

non-Caucasian subjects than Caucasians regardless of diagnostic

group. Based on the results of this study, health care

professionals should pay particular attention to non-Caucasian

males who are under their care to screen for anxiety and

depression. Both anxiety and depression may increase the morbidity

toward both cancer and heart disease. Nurses are in a unique

position among the health care team to monitor the psychosocial

stress profile factors of anxiety, depression and social support.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIdentification of a social support, anxiety and depression profile for males at risk for sudden cardiac death and males with a diagnosis of canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150350-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Identification of a social support, anxiety and depression profile for males at risk for sudden cardiac death and males with a diagnosis of cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Friedmann, Erika, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brooklyn College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Heart disease and cancer are the number one and two causes of death<br/><br/>among adults in the United States, together accounting for<br/><br/>approximately 60 percent of the total mortality. The two diseases<br/><br/>are comparable in mortality. Although deaths due to heart disease<br/><br/>have declined slightly in recent years, the death rate for cancer<br/><br/>continues to increase. The trauma associated with a myocardial<br/><br/>infarction has been equated with that of a diagnosis of cancer.<br/><br/>Both types of patients experience an event which divides their<br/><br/>lives into two qualitatively distinct periods, pre- and<br/><br/>post-diagnosis. Both groups of patients must face the possibility<br/><br/>of death in the near future, decreased physical capabilities,<br/><br/>increased dependence, loss of job and other social roles and major<br/><br/>reorientation or change in life goals (Donaldson, McCorkle,<br/><br/>Georgiadou, Benoliel, 1986). Since persons with these two<br/><br/>diagnoses face similar challenges and are often treated differently<br/><br/>by the health care team, it would be important to know if persons<br/><br/>are similar or different on selected stress factors.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The purpose of this study was to compare the social and<br/><br/>psychological stress profiles of males who were at risk for sudden<br/><br/>cardiac death (SCD) and of a second group of males with a diagnosis<br/><br/>of cancer. The effect of life threatening illness on 82 males, (65<br/><br/>Caucasians or 79 percent, 17 non-Caucasians or 21%) at risk for<br/><br/>sudden cardiac death (ScD), and 77 males (50 Caucasians or 65 percent,<br/><br/>27 non-Caucasians or 35%) with a diagnosis of cancer was assessed.<br/><br/>Social support was assessed via Saranson's Social Support<br/><br/>Questionnaire-6 (SSQ-6). The psychological factors of anxiety and<br/><br/>depression were assessed using Speilburger's State-Trait Anxiety<br/><br/>Inventory (STAI) and Sung's Depression Scale respectively.<br/><br/>Possible differences in profiles were analyzed via MANOVA.<br/><br/>Differences in individual scales of social support, anxiety and<br/><br/>depression were analyzed using ANOVA. Results confirmed that<br/><br/>members of both groups were similar on demographic factors, state<br/><br/>and trait anxiety, depression and on the amount of and satisfaction<br/><br/>with social support. Based on the results of this study, the<br/><br/>psychosocial stress profile for males at risk for SCD and males<br/><br/>with a diagnosis of cancer did not differ.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Since there were differences in the racial distributions in the two<br/><br/>groups, the effects of race on the psychosocial variables was also<br/><br/>examined. Results indicated that race was related to psychosocial<br/><br/>scores. State anxiety was significantly higher and scores related<br/><br/>to trait anxiety and depression tended to be higher in<br/><br/>non-Caucasian subjects than Caucasians regardless of diagnostic<br/><br/>group. Based on the results of this study, health care<br/><br/>professionals should pay particular attention to non-Caucasian<br/><br/>males who are under their care to screen for anxiety and<br/><br/>depression. Both anxiety and depression may increase the morbidity<br/><br/>toward both cancer and heart disease. Nurses are in a unique<br/><br/>position among the health care team to monitor the psychosocial<br/><br/>stress profile factors of anxiety, depression and social support.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:22:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:22:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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