2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150351
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of mediated instruction on maternal-infant attachment
Abstract:
Effects of mediated instruction on maternal-infant attachment
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Lester, Jerry, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas Medical Branch
School of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Sensitive and responsive mothering enhances the infant's

potential for social interaction. Demonstrating characteristics

and behaviors of newborns and appropriate caretaker responses to

mothers increases the quality of their interactions. Mediated

instruction, that is televised programming, increases maternal

confidence, enhances maternal perceptions of their infants at one

month, and increases the maternal knowledge of infant caretaking

skills. The most effective time and the long-term benefits of

offering mediated instruction to mothers are unclear. Televised

programs could complement efforts by health professionals to

enhance mother-infant interaction in a cost effective manner.



A longitudinal experimental study was designed to test the

hypothesis that mediated instruction would have significant

positive and differential time effects on maternal attachment

behaviors. Women were recruited for the study from among a

low-risk population of pregnant women. Subjects were assigned at

random to one of three treatment groups or the control group.

The videotape was seen by 55 women in late pregnancy, 49 after

delivery, 56 at two months postpartum, and 54 after all data had

been collected at four months. Mothers were videotaped with

their infants during and after a structured and mildly stressful

event for the infant, i.e., anthropometric measurement. Massie's

and Campbell's Attachment Indicators During Stress Scales (ADS)

was used to rate maternal behaviors, i.e., gazing, vocalizing,

touching, touch maintenance, affect and proximity. Each behavior

is rated on a 5 point scale from no or a minimal display of the

behavior (1 and 2) to an unusually strong display of the behavior

(5). Pairs of raters achieved 85 percent agreement across scales.



The 214 subjects who completed the study comprised a multi-ethnic

sample (caucasian-51.4%, black-33.6%, and hispanic-15%). On the

average, subjects were in their mid-twenties, had a twelfth grade

education, reported family incomes of less than $20,000, and were

expecting their first or second child. More study mothers were

married (61%) than single. Repeated measures MANOVA indicated

statistically significant group by time effects for two ADS

scales, touching (F=3.69, p=.001) and holding (F=2.82, p=.01).

Although changes in holding behavior over time for experimental

groups was not statistically significant, the mean for touching

behavior was significantly less for mothers in Group 4 than for

mothers that viewed the mediated instruction either in the

hospital (Group 2) or at two months (Group 3). At two months,

Group 3 mothers has a significantly higher mean for holding than

either of the other two treatment groups indicating an immediate

effect of the treatment. At four months, however, the Group 3 mean

was significantly lower than the Group 2 mean. Seeing the videotape

during late pregnancy (Group 1) was no more effective than not

seeing the videotape (Group 4) in terms of both maternal touching

and holding behaviors. Seeing the videotape prior to hospital

discharge had a short-term effect on maternal holding behavior as

indicated by a differentiated and higher mean for Group 2 at four

months (Group 1 vs Group 2, p=.009). The mean for Group 3 changed

toward the mean from the two to four month observation, but based

upon observed data trends, a rebound in the Group 3 mean would be

expected at a later observation. There was sufficient evidence

to reject the null of hypothesis 1, and at least tentatively

reject the null of hypothesis 2. Longitudinal research to

confirm the differential time effects of interventions on the

attachment relationship should continue. Furthermore,

statistical control should be exercised over family, maternal,

and infant variables. The security of the attachment relationship

among maternal-infant dyads in this study at 30 months is

continuing.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of mediated instruction on maternal-infant attachmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150351-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of mediated instruction on maternal-infant attachment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lester, Jerry, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas Medical Branch<br/>School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Sensitive and responsive mothering enhances the infant's<br/><br/>potential for social interaction. Demonstrating characteristics<br/><br/>and behaviors of newborns and appropriate caretaker responses to<br/><br/>mothers increases the quality of their interactions. Mediated<br/><br/>instruction, that is televised programming, increases maternal<br/><br/>confidence, enhances maternal perceptions of their infants at one<br/><br/>month, and increases the maternal knowledge of infant caretaking<br/><br/>skills. The most effective time and the long-term benefits of<br/><br/>offering mediated instruction to mothers are unclear. Televised<br/><br/>programs could complement efforts by health professionals to<br/><br/>enhance mother-infant interaction in a cost effective manner.<br/><br/><br/><br/>A longitudinal experimental study was designed to test the<br/><br/>hypothesis that mediated instruction would have significant<br/><br/>positive and differential time effects on maternal attachment<br/><br/>behaviors. Women were recruited for the study from among a<br/><br/>low-risk population of pregnant women. Subjects were assigned at<br/><br/>random to one of three treatment groups or the control group.<br/><br/>The videotape was seen by 55 women in late pregnancy, 49 after<br/><br/>delivery, 56 at two months postpartum, and 54 after all data had<br/><br/>been collected at four months. Mothers were videotaped with<br/><br/>their infants during and after a structured and mildly stressful<br/><br/>event for the infant, i.e., anthropometric measurement. Massie's<br/><br/>and Campbell's Attachment Indicators During Stress Scales (ADS)<br/><br/>was used to rate maternal behaviors, i.e., gazing, vocalizing,<br/><br/>touching, touch maintenance, affect and proximity. Each behavior<br/><br/>is rated on a 5 point scale from no or a minimal display of the<br/><br/>behavior (1 and 2) to an unusually strong display of the behavior<br/><br/>(5). Pairs of raters achieved 85 percent agreement across scales.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The 214 subjects who completed the study comprised a multi-ethnic<br/><br/>sample (caucasian-51.4%, black-33.6%, and hispanic-15%). On the<br/><br/>average, subjects were in their mid-twenties, had a twelfth grade<br/><br/>education, reported family incomes of less than $20,000, and were<br/><br/>expecting their first or second child. More study mothers were<br/><br/>married (61%) than single. Repeated measures MANOVA indicated<br/><br/>statistically significant group by time effects for two ADS<br/><br/>scales, touching (F=3.69, p=.001) and holding (F=2.82, p=.01).<br/><br/>Although changes in holding behavior over time for experimental<br/><br/>groups was not statistically significant, the mean for touching<br/><br/>behavior was significantly less for mothers in Group 4 than for<br/><br/>mothers that viewed the mediated instruction either in the<br/><br/>hospital (Group 2) or at two months (Group 3). At two months,<br/><br/>Group 3 mothers has a significantly higher mean for holding than<br/><br/>either of the other two treatment groups indicating an immediate<br/><br/>effect of the treatment. At four months, however, the Group 3 mean<br/><br/>was significantly lower than the Group 2 mean. Seeing the videotape<br/><br/>during late pregnancy (Group 1) was no more effective than not<br/><br/>seeing the videotape (Group 4) in terms of both maternal touching<br/><br/>and holding behaviors. Seeing the videotape prior to hospital<br/><br/>discharge had a short-term effect on maternal holding behavior as<br/><br/>indicated by a differentiated and higher mean for Group 2 at four<br/><br/>months (Group 1 vs Group 2, p=.009). The mean for Group 3 changed<br/><br/>toward the mean from the two to four month observation, but based<br/><br/>upon observed data trends, a rebound in the Group 3 mean would be<br/><br/>expected at a later observation. There was sufficient evidence<br/><br/>to reject the null of hypothesis 1, and at least tentatively<br/><br/>reject the null of hypothesis 2. Longitudinal research to<br/><br/>confirm the differential time effects of interventions on the<br/><br/>attachment relationship should continue. Furthermore,<br/><br/>statistical control should be exercised over family, maternal,<br/><br/>and infant variables. The security of the attachment relationship<br/><br/>among maternal-infant dyads in this study at 30 months is<br/><br/>continuing.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:22:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:22:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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