The relationships of nurses' critical thinking ability and patient self-disclosure to accuracy in nursing assessment of depression among elderly medical patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150353
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The relationships of nurses' critical thinking ability and patient self-disclosure to accuracy in nursing assessment of depression among elderly medical patients
Abstract:
The relationships of nurses' critical thinking ability and patient self-disclosure to accuracy in nursing assessment of depression among elderly medical patients
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Gonzalez, Elizabeth, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Allegheny University of the Health Sciences
Title:
Research on nursing assessment of patients' needs and experiences is sparse. Yet it is such assessments upon which nursing care is planned and provided. Although the process by which a nurse accurately assesses needs and experiences of patients is not yet fully understood, it appears that specific interpersonal and intellectual skills are needed (Gordon, 1987; Young, 1988). This descriptive study investigated the relationships of nurses' critical thinking ability and patient self-disclosure to accuracy in nursing assessment of depression in elderly medical patients, while statistically controlling for nurses' education.



Theoretical Rationale: Assessment is the systematic collection and analysis of data about a patient for the purpose of making a nursing diagnosis or judgment (Gordon, 1982). Clinical judgment involves data transformation (Levy, 1963) and is a product of inferential process (Sarbin, Taft, and Bailey, 1960). The inferential process has four elements: a) the purpose of the cognitive work; b) the information out of which inferences are fashioned; c) the product of the inferential process, clinical judgment. Clinical judgment requires the intellectual skill of critical thinking which, in turn, may influence the accuracy of nursing assessment. Patient self-disclosure provides the subjective data needed for a comprehensive assessment of the patient's experience of depression. Patient self-disclosure is a process by which an individual reveals his feelings, thoughts, and experiences to another person (Jourard, 1971).



Hypotheses: 1) There is a positive relationship between nurses' critical thinking ability and accuracy in nursing assessment of depression, independent of nurses' education; 2) There is a positive relationship between patient self-disclosure and accuracy in nursing assessment of depression, independent of nurses' education; 3) Nurses' critical thinking ability and patient self-disclosure interact in relation to accuracy in nursing assessment of depression. Specifically, the relationship of nurses' critical thinking ability to accuracy in nursing assessment of depression is expected to be stronger when there is high patient self-disclosure than when there is low patient self-disclosure.



Method: A nonprobability, convenience sample of 120 nurse-patient dyads were recruited from the medical units of hospitals in Philadelphia and New Jersey. To maintain independence of dyads, each nurse was paired with only one patient. Critical thinking ability was measured by the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal (WGCTA, 1980). Accuracy in nursing assessment of depression was measured by the magnitude of prediction error (absolute value), using the nurse's score in the Depression Status Inventory (DSI) (Zung, 1972) to predict the patient's score in the Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) (Zung, 1973). A modified DSI was used to measure patient self-disclosure. Multiple regression analysis was used to analyze the data.



Findings: Hypothesis 1 was supported. Nurses' critical thinking ability had a regression coefficient of -.15 which was statistically significant (p=.004) after partialling out nurses' education. The result showed that nurses with high critical thinking abilities had low magnitude of error in nursing assessment of depression. Hypotheses 2 and 3 were not supported. The implication is that educational efforts may best be directed toward assisting students and staff nurses to develop critical thinking ability.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe relationships of nurses' critical thinking ability and patient self-disclosure to accuracy in nursing assessment of depression among elderly medical patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150353-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The relationships of nurses' critical thinking ability and patient self-disclosure to accuracy in nursing assessment of depression among elderly medical patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gonzalez, Elizabeth, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Allegheny University of the Health Sciences</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value"> </td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gonzalez@auhs.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Research on nursing assessment of patients' needs and experiences is sparse. Yet it is such assessments upon which nursing care is planned and provided. Although the process by which a nurse accurately assesses needs and experiences of patients is not yet fully understood, it appears that specific interpersonal and intellectual skills are needed (Gordon, 1987; Young, 1988). This descriptive study investigated the relationships of nurses' critical thinking ability and patient self-disclosure to accuracy in nursing assessment of depression in elderly medical patients, while statistically controlling for nurses' education.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Theoretical Rationale: Assessment is the systematic collection and analysis of data about a patient for the purpose of making a nursing diagnosis or judgment (Gordon, 1982). Clinical judgment involves data transformation (Levy, 1963) and is a product of inferential process (Sarbin, Taft, and Bailey, 1960). The inferential process has four elements: a) the purpose of the cognitive work; b) the information out of which inferences are fashioned; c) the product of the inferential process, clinical judgment. Clinical judgment requires the intellectual skill of critical thinking which, in turn, may influence the accuracy of nursing assessment. Patient self-disclosure provides the subjective data needed for a comprehensive assessment of the patient's experience of depression. Patient self-disclosure is a process by which an individual reveals his feelings, thoughts, and experiences to another person (Jourard, 1971).<br/><br/><br/><br/>Hypotheses: 1) There is a positive relationship between nurses' critical thinking ability and accuracy in nursing assessment of depression, independent of nurses' education; 2) There is a positive relationship between patient self-disclosure and accuracy in nursing assessment of depression, independent of nurses' education; 3) Nurses' critical thinking ability and patient self-disclosure interact in relation to accuracy in nursing assessment of depression. Specifically, the relationship of nurses' critical thinking ability to accuracy in nursing assessment of depression is expected to be stronger when there is high patient self-disclosure than when there is low patient self-disclosure.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Method: A nonprobability, convenience sample of 120 nurse-patient dyads were recruited from the medical units of hospitals in Philadelphia and New Jersey. To maintain independence of dyads, each nurse was paired with only one patient. Critical thinking ability was measured by the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal (WGCTA, 1980). Accuracy in nursing assessment of depression was measured by the magnitude of prediction error (absolute value), using the nurse's score in the Depression Status Inventory (DSI) (Zung, 1972) to predict the patient's score in the Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) (Zung, 1973). A modified DSI was used to measure patient self-disclosure. Multiple regression analysis was used to analyze the data.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Findings: Hypothesis 1 was supported. Nurses' critical thinking ability had a regression coefficient of -.15 which was statistically significant (p=.004) after partialling out nurses' education. The result showed that nurses with high critical thinking abilities had low magnitude of error in nursing assessment of depression. Hypotheses 2 and 3 were not supported. The implication is that educational efforts may best be directed toward assisting students and staff nurses to develop critical thinking ability.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:22:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:22:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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