A phenomenological investigation of the meaning of feeling professional in nursing practice

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150354
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A phenomenological investigation of the meaning of feeling professional in nursing practice
Abstract:
A phenomenological investigation of the meaning of feeling professional in nursing practice
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Neville, Susan, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of New York
Title:Assistant Professor
This phenomenological research was designed to investigate the

meaning of the experience of feeling professional in nursing

practice. Common themes and the structure of the phenomenon were

uncovered, seeking to address the question from the perspective of

practicing registered nurses.



The issue of nursing's struggle to advance as a profession and its

need to examine, clarify, and redefine its professional criteria

has intensified. This controversy revolves around the criteria

identified as essential to professional status used by society at

large and nursing in particular. Nursing may have unique criteria

and not yet generally accepted or recognized in addition to, or in

lieu of, the established criteria. The issue of nursing's

professional status justifies and requires investigation of the

actual meaning of the phenomenon in practice.



This study explored the meaning of professionalism using

qualitative methodology. By exploring and describing practice

situations identified by nurses living the phenomenon, data emerged

grounded in the reality of practice.



The purposive sample consisted of practicing registered

professional female nurses licensed to practice in New York State,

educationally prepared at the diploma, associate degree or

baccalaureate degree level, practicing on a medical/surgical care

unit in a hospital setting for more than one year. Potential

participants, meeting the criteria for selection, were invited to

participate. Informed consent ensuring the right to

confidentiality and the right to withdraw from the study was

obtained. The participants were asked to write a description of a

practice situation in which they experienced feeling professional

in nursing practice. Following analysis of the initial

description, the researcher requested an elaborated description in

writing and an interview, which was recorded.



The raw data were analyzed, using the Giorgi (1979) Modification of

Phenomenological Method.



This analysis resulted in a comprehensive description of the

meaning of the experience of feeling professional in nursing

practice. The essential meaning for these subjects was a sense of

plenitude arising from anticipatory preparedness while connecting

with self and others in complex situations over time. Plenitude is

satisfaction, recognition and commitment of self and by others.

Plenitude evolves from recognizing the value of nursing in terms of

quality nursing care and effective patient outcomes. Anticipatory

Preparedness includes intuitive and empirical knowing while

Connectedness involves a feeling of unity, validation and support.

Relationship establishment and connectedness may be personal,

situational, technical or attitudinal. These findings contributed

to the knowledge base of professionalism, having implications in

the next decade for nursing theory, research and practice by

identifying and supporting the concept of professionalism from a

nursing practice perspective.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA phenomenological investigation of the meaning of feeling professional in nursing practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150354-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A phenomenological investigation of the meaning of feeling professional in nursing practice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Neville, Susan, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of New York</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This phenomenological research was designed to investigate the<br/><br/>meaning of the experience of feeling professional in nursing<br/><br/>practice. Common themes and the structure of the phenomenon were<br/><br/>uncovered, seeking to address the question from the perspective of<br/><br/>practicing registered nurses.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The issue of nursing's struggle to advance as a profession and its<br/><br/>need to examine, clarify, and redefine its professional criteria<br/><br/>has intensified. This controversy revolves around the criteria<br/><br/>identified as essential to professional status used by society at<br/><br/>large and nursing in particular. Nursing may have unique criteria<br/><br/>and not yet generally accepted or recognized in addition to, or in<br/><br/>lieu of, the established criteria. The issue of nursing's<br/><br/>professional status justifies and requires investigation of the<br/><br/>actual meaning of the phenomenon in practice.<br/><br/><br/><br/>This study explored the meaning of professionalism using<br/><br/>qualitative methodology. By exploring and describing practice<br/><br/>situations identified by nurses living the phenomenon, data emerged<br/><br/>grounded in the reality of practice.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The purposive sample consisted of practicing registered<br/><br/>professional female nurses licensed to practice in New York State,<br/><br/>educationally prepared at the diploma, associate degree or<br/><br/>baccalaureate degree level, practicing on a medical/surgical care<br/><br/>unit in a hospital setting for more than one year. Potential<br/><br/>participants, meeting the criteria for selection, were invited to<br/><br/>participate. Informed consent ensuring the right to<br/><br/>confidentiality and the right to withdraw from the study was<br/><br/>obtained. The participants were asked to write a description of a<br/><br/>practice situation in which they experienced feeling professional<br/><br/>in nursing practice. Following analysis of the initial<br/><br/>description, the researcher requested an elaborated description in<br/><br/>writing and an interview, which was recorded.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The raw data were analyzed, using the Giorgi (1979) Modification of<br/><br/>Phenomenological Method.<br/><br/><br/><br/>This analysis resulted in a comprehensive description of the<br/><br/>meaning of the experience of feeling professional in nursing<br/><br/>practice. The essential meaning for these subjects was a sense of<br/><br/>plenitude arising from anticipatory preparedness while connecting<br/><br/>with self and others in complex situations over time. Plenitude is<br/><br/>satisfaction, recognition and commitment of self and by others.<br/><br/>Plenitude evolves from recognizing the value of nursing in terms of<br/><br/>quality nursing care and effective patient outcomes. Anticipatory<br/><br/>Preparedness includes intuitive and empirical knowing while<br/><br/>Connectedness involves a feeling of unity, validation and support.<br/><br/>Relationship establishment and connectedness may be personal,<br/><br/>situational, technical or attitudinal. These findings contributed<br/><br/>to the knowledge base of professionalism, having implications in<br/><br/>the next decade for nursing theory, research and practice by<br/><br/>identifying and supporting the concept of professionalism from a<br/><br/>nursing practice perspective.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:22:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:22:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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