2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150356
Type:
Presentation
Title:
California Hospital AIDS Prevention Survey
Abstract:
California Hospital AIDS Prevention Survey
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Crabtree, Mary, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:Oregon Health Sciences University
Title:Associate Professor
In 1988 there were 5,812 Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS)

cases reported in California, representing 21 percent of all cases.

With the rising number of AIDS cases and the inevitable impact on

the health care system, the protection of health care workers has

become a major concern. Protection of health care workers is

mandated by the Occupational Health and Safety Act of 1970 which

requires employers to provide a safe work environment. In August

1987 the CDC issued guidelines based on universal precautions that

were designed to protect health care workers from transmission of

HIV Universal precautions mandate protective measures be taken

with all patients rather than restricting the use of protective

measures to previously diagnosed persons.





A descriptive stratified random survey of 50 California hospitals

was undertaken to determine areas where hospital policy was not in

compliance with CDC guidelines for universal precautions. Nine

small (<100 beds); 13 medium (100-300 beds); and 4 large hospitals

(> 300 beds) responded for a participation rate of 46 percent. Two

hospitals were included in a pilot test of the questionnaires and

procedure. One hundred sixteen questionnaires and telephone

interviews were completed by Hospital Directors, Infection Control

Coordinators, Employee Health Directors, Directors of Laboratory

Services, Directors of Staff Development, and AIDS Experts. The

Kuder-Richardson reliability coefficients for items

measuring compliance of hospital policy for the general hospital staff and

laboratory personnel were .91 and .68, respectively.



Twenty-three hospitals based their policy on the CDC Guidelines.

The total average percent compliance was 77 percent. The average

compliance scores for policies pertaining to general hospital staff

(81 percent) were higher than for laboratory personnel (70

percent). The areas of the CDC Guidelines where the mean

percentage compliance fell below 70 percent were exposure

management for general hospital staff and disposal/disinfection for

laboratory personnel. Fifty-seven percent of the hospitals

surveyed had policies that specified actions taken for employee

nonadherence. Annual occupational HIV exposures among health care

workers (HCWs) ranged from 0-120 per hospital. Twenty-four HCWs

were HIV tested following exposure. No seroconversions were

reported. Sixteen hospitals (67 percent) offer HIV testing to any

concerned HCWs. Half of the hospitals restrict workers who are HIV

positive and workers with AIDS.



Hospital Directors' concerns were primarily financial due to the

increased cost of supplies and educational training. Sixty-two

percent of all employees had attended HIV educational programs.

There was a need for additional staff education, particularly among

staff handling infected waste. Other recommendations include the

development of policies that spell out the consequences of

nonadherence which may result in increased employee compliance.

Occupational health nurse practitioners can use the results of this

survey to review policies and guide their practice with persons

employed in health care settings.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCalifornia Hospital AIDS Prevention Surveyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150356-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">California Hospital AIDS Prevention Survey</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Crabtree, Mary, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oregon Health Sciences University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In 1988 there were 5,812 Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS)<br/><br/> cases reported in California, representing 21 percent of all cases.<br/><br/> With the rising number of AIDS cases and the inevitable impact on<br/><br/> the health care system, the protection of health care workers has<br/><br/> become a major concern. Protection of health care workers is <br/><br/> mandated by the Occupational Health and Safety Act of 1970 which<br/><br/> requires employers to provide a safe work environment. In August<br/><br/> 1987 the CDC issued guidelines based on universal precautions that<br/><br/> were designed to protect health care workers from transmission of<br/><br/> HIV Universal precautions mandate protective measures be taken<br/><br/> with all patients rather than restricting the use of protective<br/><br/> measures to previously diagnosed persons.<br/><br/><br/><br/> <br/><br/>A descriptive stratified random survey of 50 California hospitals<br/><br/> was undertaken to determine areas where hospital policy was not in<br/><br/> compliance with CDC guidelines for universal precautions. Nine<br/><br/> small (&lt;100 beds); 13 medium (100-300 beds); and 4 large hospitals<br/><br/> (&gt; 300 beds) responded for a participation rate of 46 percent. Two<br/><br/> hospitals were included in a pilot test of the questionnaires and<br/><br/> procedure. One hundred sixteen questionnaires and telephone<br/><br/> interviews were completed by Hospital Directors, Infection Control<br/><br/> Coordinators, Employee Health Directors, Directors of Laboratory<br/><br/> Services, Directors of Staff Development, and AIDS Experts. The<br/><br/> Kuder-Richardson reliability coefficients for items <br/><br/> measuring compliance of hospital policy for the general hospital staff and<br/><br/> laboratory personnel were .91 and .68, respectively.<br/><br/><br/><br/> Twenty-three hospitals based their policy on the CDC Guidelines.<br/><br/> The total average percent compliance was 77 percent. The average<br/><br/> compliance scores for policies pertaining to general hospital staff<br/><br/> (81 percent) were higher than for laboratory personnel (70<br/><br/> percent). The areas of the CDC Guidelines where the mean<br/><br/> percentage compliance fell below 70 percent were exposure<br/><br/> management for general hospital staff and disposal/disinfection for<br/><br/> laboratory personnel. Fifty-seven percent of the hospitals<br/><br/> surveyed had policies that specified actions taken for employee<br/><br/> nonadherence. Annual occupational HIV exposures among health care<br/><br/> workers (HCWs) ranged from 0-120 per hospital. Twenty-four HCWs<br/><br/> were HIV tested following exposure. No seroconversions were<br/><br/> reported. Sixteen hospitals (67 percent) offer HIV testing to any<br/><br/> concerned HCWs. Half of the hospitals restrict workers who are HIV<br/><br/> positive and workers with AIDS. <br/><br/><br/><br/>Hospital Directors' concerns were primarily financial due to the<br/><br/> increased cost of supplies and educational training. Sixty-two<br/><br/> percent of all employees had attended HIV educational programs.<br/><br/> There was a need for additional staff education, particularly among<br/><br/> staff handling infected waste. Other recommendations include the<br/><br/> development of policies that spell out the consequences of<br/><br/> nonadherence which may result in increased employee compliance.<br/><br/> Occupational health nurse practitioners can use the results of this<br/><br/> survey to review policies and guide their practice with persons<br/><br/> employed in health care settings. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:22:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:22:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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