Experience of caring in the acute caring setting: Patient and nurse perspectives

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150357
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Experience of caring in the acute caring setting: Patient and nurse perspectives
Abstract:
Experience of caring in the acute caring setting: Patient and nurse perspectives
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Miller, Barbara, EdD
P.I. Institution Name:College of Mount Saint Vincent
Title:Chairperson Graduate Program
Problem: Leininger (1990) suggest that more knowledge, through

research, is needed for an in-depth understanding of care as the

essence of and critical factor in knowing and explaining nursing

(p.20).



Purpose: To understand the phenomenon of caring in the acute care

setting from patients' and nurses' perspectives using a

phenomenological design (Giorgi, 1985; Streubert, 1989).



Methodology: Protocols were followed in the study institution for

conducting research. Interviews with subjects (15 patients, 16

nurses) were conducted until themes of caring were determined.

Phenomenological analysis of the transcribed interviews revealed

parallel themes of: holistic understanding, connectedness,

presence, anticipation and monitoring of needs, and beyond the

mechanical.



Findings: Patient and Nurse Exhaustive descriptions of a caring

nurse-patient interaction were developed based on the identified

themes. The patient and nurse exhaustive descriptions were

validated with the majority of the subjects.



Conclusions: The major contributions of the findings of this study

are that the results lend support to: 1) theories of caring in and

outside of the discipline of nursing (e.g. Benner, 1984; Leininger,

1985) and, 2) nursing research on caring in the practice and

educational settings (e.g. Miller, Haber and Byrne, 1990; Riemen,

1986). The findings are evidence of nursing's commitment to a

sustained program of research on a concept so essential to its

growth as a science. The results of the study corroborate in

general Riemen's (1986) work on the essential structure of a caring

nurse-patient interaction from the client's perspective, as well as

the specific finding that caring interactions do not necessarily

take a lot of time. The findings indicate that both nurses and

patients agree that certain types of nurse behaviors are caring

and that they are essential to the recovery process.



Recommendations: Additional phenomenological studies are needed in

order to better understand and define caring. The results of such

studies will assist in: 1)implementing specific care behaviors in

the philosophy of educational and practice settings and 2) in

conducting quantitative studies for evaluating caring behaviors in

the practice and educational settings. Care behaviors could be

continually validated and evaluated by including them in patient

and student surveys. As the body of knowledge concerning caring

grows, not only nursing but all caring professions can draw from

it.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExperience of caring in the acute caring setting: Patient and nurse perspectivesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150357-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Experience of caring in the acute caring setting: Patient and nurse perspectives</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Miller, Barbara, EdD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">College of Mount Saint Vincent</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Chairperson Graduate Program</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Leininger (1990) suggest that more knowledge, through<br/><br/>research, is needed for an in-depth understanding of care as the<br/><br/>essence of and critical factor in knowing and explaining nursing<br/><br/>(p.20).<br/><br/><br/><br/>Purpose: To understand the phenomenon of caring in the acute care<br/><br/>setting from patients' and nurses' perspectives using a<br/><br/>phenomenological design (Giorgi, 1985; Streubert, 1989).<br/><br/><br/><br/>Methodology: Protocols were followed in the study institution for<br/><br/>conducting research. Interviews with subjects (15 patients, 16<br/><br/>nurses) were conducted until themes of caring were determined.<br/><br/>Phenomenological analysis of the transcribed interviews revealed<br/><br/>parallel themes of: holistic understanding, connectedness,<br/><br/>presence, anticipation and monitoring of needs, and beyond the<br/><br/>mechanical.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Findings: Patient and Nurse Exhaustive descriptions of a caring<br/><br/>nurse-patient interaction were developed based on the identified<br/><br/>themes. The patient and nurse exhaustive descriptions were<br/><br/>validated with the majority of the subjects.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Conclusions: The major contributions of the findings of this study<br/><br/>are that the results lend support to: 1) theories of caring in and<br/><br/>outside of the discipline of nursing (e.g. Benner, 1984; Leininger,<br/><br/>1985) and, 2) nursing research on caring in the practice and<br/><br/>educational settings (e.g. Miller, Haber and Byrne, 1990; Riemen,<br/><br/>1986). The findings are evidence of nursing's commitment to a<br/><br/>sustained program of research on a concept so essential to its<br/><br/>growth as a science. The results of the study corroborate in<br/><br/>general Riemen's (1986) work on the essential structure of a caring<br/><br/>nurse-patient interaction from the client's perspective, as well as<br/><br/>the specific finding that caring interactions do not necessarily<br/><br/>take a lot of time. The findings indicate that both nurses and<br/><br/>patients agree that certain types of nurse behaviors are caring<br/><br/>and that they are essential to the recovery process.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Recommendations: Additional phenomenological studies are needed in<br/><br/>order to better understand and define caring. The results of such<br/><br/>studies will assist in: 1)implementing specific care behaviors in<br/><br/>the philosophy of educational and practice settings and 2) in<br/><br/>conducting quantitative studies for evaluating caring behaviors in<br/><br/>the practice and educational settings. Care behaviors could be<br/><br/>continually validated and evaluated by including them in patient<br/><br/>and student surveys. As the body of knowledge concerning caring<br/><br/>grows, not only nursing but all caring professions can draw from<br/><br/>it.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:22:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:22:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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