Influencing Adolescent Behavior in 30 Minutes or Less: An Innovative Teaching Strategy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150362
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Influencing Adolescent Behavior in 30 Minutes or Less: An Innovative Teaching Strategy
Abstract:
Influencing Adolescent Behavior in 30 Minutes or Less: An Innovative Teaching Strategy
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Grissom, Neena
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
Nursing education mandates that students be exposed to diverse environments in which professional nurses practice. The complexity of health care today dictates that many students will work as health care practitioners in community-based settings. In an effort to introduce students to diverse practice environments, faculty at a large college of nursing in the mid-south developed an innovative teaching strategy that provided students with an opportunity to impact the health of adolescents in a community setting. Junior nursing students worked in collaboration with a local public high school to identify health topics of concern. Working in groups, students chose a topic and developed a teaching plan that included behavioral objectives, content outline, teaching strategies/learning activities, and methods of evaluating teaching effectiveness. Using teaching-learning principles appropriate for the adolescent age group, the students created tabletop booths that were displayed in the high school cafeteria during lunchtime. This presented a challenge to impact groups of adolescents in 30 minutes or less. To attract teens to the booths, nursing students used eye-catching displays, graphic photographs and posters that illustrated the effects of negative health behaviors, and give-a-ways. Presentation topics included: Eating Disorders, Effects of Smokeless Tobacco Use, Nutrition and Healthy Eating, Hypertension, Date Rape, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, and Tattoos and Piercing. Over 400 teens visited the booths in a two-hour period. Teens were given information on health promotion and disease prevention. Topics addressed the teens’ perceived needs and were presented in a non-threatening manner and environment. Because the lunch hour was used, the booths did not disrupt classes or the normal routine. The booths also gave teens the opportunity to discuss potentially embarrassing information with their peers and with nursing students who seemed close to their own age. Teachers at the high school saw the young, goal-oriented nursing students as good role models for the teens. This was a serendipitous benefit. This teaching strategy introduced nursing students to the community and taught them how to collaborate with each other and work in groups. It exposed beginning students to the impact nurses can have on adolescents in the community. Nursing students identified age-appropriate teaching-learning strategies and felt the positive benefits of influencing attitudes and behaviors of adolescents. Students were also required to provide a written summary of the project that evaluated teaching effectiveness, strengths and weaknesses, and recommendations for change. Implementation of the project fostered development of skills in critical thinking and communication, while applying the nursing process in a community setting.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInfluencing Adolescent Behavior in 30 Minutes or Less: An Innovative Teaching Strategyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150362-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Influencing Adolescent Behavior in 30 Minutes or Less: An Innovative Teaching Strategy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Grissom, Neena</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">grissomneenal@uams.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nursing education mandates that students be exposed to diverse environments in which professional nurses practice. The complexity of health care today dictates that many students will work as health care practitioners in community-based settings. In an effort to introduce students to diverse practice environments, faculty at a large college of nursing in the mid-south developed an innovative teaching strategy that provided students with an opportunity to impact the health of adolescents in a community setting. Junior nursing students worked in collaboration with a local public high school to identify health topics of concern. Working in groups, students chose a topic and developed a teaching plan that included behavioral objectives, content outline, teaching strategies/learning activities, and methods of evaluating teaching effectiveness. Using teaching-learning principles appropriate for the adolescent age group, the students created tabletop booths that were displayed in the high school cafeteria during lunchtime. This presented a challenge to impact groups of adolescents in 30 minutes or less. To attract teens to the booths, nursing students used eye-catching displays, graphic photographs and posters that illustrated the effects of negative health behaviors, and give-a-ways. Presentation topics included: Eating Disorders, Effects of Smokeless Tobacco Use, Nutrition and Healthy Eating, Hypertension, Date Rape, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, and Tattoos and Piercing. Over 400 teens visited the booths in a two-hour period. Teens were given information on health promotion and disease prevention. Topics addressed the teens&rsquo; perceived needs and were presented in a non-threatening manner and environment. Because the lunch hour was used, the booths did not disrupt classes or the normal routine. The booths also gave teens the opportunity to discuss potentially embarrassing information with their peers and with nursing students who seemed close to their own age. Teachers at the high school saw the young, goal-oriented nursing students as good role models for the teens. This was a serendipitous benefit. This teaching strategy introduced nursing students to the community and taught them how to collaborate with each other and work in groups. It exposed beginning students to the impact nurses can have on adolescents in the community. Nursing students identified age-appropriate teaching-learning strategies and felt the positive benefits of influencing attitudes and behaviors of adolescents. Students were also required to provide a written summary of the project that evaluated teaching effectiveness, strengths and weaknesses, and recommendations for change. Implementation of the project fostered development of skills in critical thinking and communication, while applying the nursing process in a community setting.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:22:40Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:22:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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