2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150363
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Genetics in nursing
Abstract:
Genetics in nursing
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Seguin, Jeanine
P.I. Institution Name:Keuka College
Description of Project (Including Rationale): As part of the BSN curriculum revision at Keuka College, a three (3) credit genetics course was added. This course is required for both traditional and RN completion students and provides the nurse of the future with a basic understanding of the principles of human genetics. Major content areas include the Human Genome Project, cross-cultural issues of human genetics, genetic conditions across the lifespan, and the inherent ethical dilemmas that this expanding knowledge will pose for modern health care providers. I received training to provide this course through the Genetics Program for Nursing Faculty funded by the Ethical, Legal and Social Implications Research Program of the National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health. Students were exposed to content on genetic syndromes that are detected and/or diagnosed from pre-natal to adult. An on-campus laboratory experience allowed the students to harvest their own DNA and evaluate it through gel electrophoresis. A field trip to the cytogenetics lab of a teaching medical center provided the students with an opportunity to see the processes involved in karyotyping and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. This content is essential for the nurse of the present as well as the nurse of the future. Genetics information is readily accessible to health care consumers. Nurses need to assure that consumers possess accurate, unbiased information to make informed choices. Baccalaureate prepared nurses need to be: able to obtain a three generation family history for the purpose of identifying persons affected by or at risk for manifesting and/or transmitting genetic conditions; aware of the type of information available to and needed by consumers to make an informed decision about genetic testing; and be able to locate the professionals in their communities who can provide the comprehensive, balanced genetic testing information needed by consumers. Target Population: Baccalaureate Nursing Students. Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, the students will be able to: (1) offer genetic information and resources to clients; (2) help with the collection, reporting, and recording of genetic information; (3) support informed choice regarding health and reproductive decisions; (4) advocate for privacy, confidentiality, and non-discrimination with regard to genetic information; (5) participate in management of patients with genetic conditions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGenetics in nursingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150363-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Genetics in nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Seguin, Jeanine</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Keuka College</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jseguin@mail.keuka.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Description of Project (Including Rationale): As part of the BSN curriculum revision at Keuka College, a three (3) credit genetics course was added. This course is required for both traditional and RN completion students and provides the nurse of the future with a basic understanding of the principles of human genetics. Major content areas include the Human Genome Project, cross-cultural issues of human genetics, genetic conditions across the lifespan, and the inherent ethical dilemmas that this expanding knowledge will pose for modern health care providers. I received training to provide this course through the Genetics Program for Nursing Faculty funded by the Ethical, Legal and Social Implications Research Program of the National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health. Students were exposed to content on genetic syndromes that are detected and/or diagnosed from pre-natal to adult. An on-campus laboratory experience allowed the students to harvest their own DNA and evaluate it through gel electrophoresis. A field trip to the cytogenetics lab of a teaching medical center provided the students with an opportunity to see the processes involved in karyotyping and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. This content is essential for the nurse of the present as well as the nurse of the future. Genetics information is readily accessible to health care consumers. Nurses need to assure that consumers possess accurate, unbiased information to make informed choices. Baccalaureate prepared nurses need to be: able to obtain a three generation family history for the purpose of identifying persons affected by or at risk for manifesting and/or transmitting genetic conditions; aware of the type of information available to and needed by consumers to make an informed decision about genetic testing; and be able to locate the professionals in their communities who can provide the comprehensive, balanced genetic testing information needed by consumers. Target Population: Baccalaureate Nursing Students. Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, the students will be able to: (1) offer genetic information and resources to clients; (2) help with the collection, reporting, and recording of genetic information; (3) support informed choice regarding health and reproductive decisions; (4) advocate for privacy, confidentiality, and non-discrimination with regard to genetic information; (5) participate in management of patients with genetic conditions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:22:41Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:22:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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